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The session drew attention to sustainable hygiene and health solutions, highlighting policy advances and often-neglected areas of sanitation

The event will discuss approaches to ensure good hygiene and health practices across the different stages of life

WSSCC is revisiting some of its key publications that provide evidence and insight for sanitation-related programming.

In Cambodia, a Global Sanitation Fund (GSF)-supported programme is using real-time and action learning techniques to increase its impact.

Participants shared best practices, common challenges, and promising innovations to end open defecation by 2025.

Sessions discussed the impact of quality research evidence on the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sector in India.

Members now benefit from automatic approval to join the WSSCC-hosted Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene (CoP) on LinkedIn

WSSCC’s participation and partnerships at the conference reinforced the council’s achievements and commitments to the WASH sector.

WSSCC’s strategy consultation in Pakistan will help guide WSSCC as it develops its new global strategy and increases engagement in the country.

WSSCC and its partners actively promoted MHM at the Women Deliver Conference in Copenhagen.

Highlights from the side event at the 60th Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) in New York.

More and more organisations working in sanitation and hygiene support the vision that equitable and sustainable sanitation and hygiene behaviour change and services at scale should be delivered through locally driven and locally sustained institutions, mechanisms and service providers. This calls for strengthening these institutions, mechanisms and providers at the level where they operate, regionally, […]

Resources

Health and Hygiene across the Life Course: World Health Assembly ...

Equality
During the World Health Assembly 2017, the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC), SCA, Government of Kenya and WaterAid came together to share approaches to ensure good hygiene and health practices and to raise standards across the life course, from childhood to adolescence, from motherhood to menopause, to old age and responding to disabilities. The session took place in the morning on 24 May 2017 at the Intercontinental Hotel in Geneva, and was attended by more than 40 international delegates from UN agencies, private sector, member states, NGOs and academia.

We Can’t Wait – A report on sanitation and hygiene for women and ...

Equality
A collaborative approach between governments, civil society and business is essential to getting the Millennium Development Goal sanitation target back on track. This is critical to improve the health and prosperity of women worldwide, said a new report jointly published by WSSCC, WaterAid and Unilever’s leading toilet brand Domestos. This report highlights the stark consequences for women and girls of the lack of access to toilets or use of good hygiene practices. One in three women worldwide risk shame, disease, harassment and even attack because they have nowhere safe to go to the toilet and 526 million women have no choice but to go to the toilet out in the open. Women and girls living without any toilets spend 97 billion hours each year finding a place to go. The report also brings together real life case studies of people in the developing world, alongside research from a variety of organizations and agencies that examine the impact of a lack of sanitation on women and girls.Il y a urgence - Rapport sur l’assainissement et l’hygiène en faveur des femmes et des filles

Equity and Inclusion in Sanitation and Hygiene in South Asia – A ...

Equality
There are two facets to the problem in South Asia, both of which are unacceptable. The first is a problem of scale: 716 million men, women, and children defecate in the open every day in South Asia, especially in rural areas: a veritable sanitation crisis that impairs progress in the region. Many districts in India, Nepal, and Pakistan fall in this category. The second, and in many ways more pernicious problem, particularly in South Asia, is one of exclusion, where different categories of people are not able to access and use safe sanitation facilities. These categories of people include those who are socially and economically marginalized or excluded, and those who cannot use standard designs. This catalytic working paper, including a bibliography, was developed for the Technical Session during the 4th South Asian Conference on Sanitation (SACOSAN IV) Reaching the Unserved: Equity and Inclusion in South Asia. It is intended for discussion leading to collaborative action.

Effective Hygiene Behaviour Change Programming – Messages from th...

Collaboration
In February 2010, during a workshop organized by BRAC, WaterAid, IRC and the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council, 50 hygiene practitioners and researchers from South and South East Asia came to together to share lessons learned, and discuss progress and challenges in promoting hygienic behaviours. Eighteen papers were presented and discussed, representing a range of experiences. Considerable progress has been made in research, in improving knowledge about hygiene, and, partially, in improving hygienic practices. In five of the programmes represented at this workshop, hygiene promotion is being implemented at scale with more than one million people. The detailed discussions led to nine recommendations, presented on the document. The papers of the workshop can be found in our resource section.

Advocacy Sourcebook – A guide to advocacy for WSSCC co-ordinators...

Collaboration
Out of every ten people in the world today, four do not have adequate sanitation and two don’t have access to clean water. Though preventable, related diseases cause the death of a child every 15 seconds. Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) campaigns, with their use of practical thinking and political commitment, can make a huge impact on these figures. Placing people’s initiatives and capacity for self-reliance at the centre of achieving water and sanitation targets, they address the issues of sustainability, affordability and equity. To complement the WASH approach, WSSCC and WaterAid have produced this practical guide on water and sanitation related advocacy work. In its four sections you'll find explanations of the different advocacy tools, practical examples of advocacy work, information on key policy actors and processes, along with how to influence them at local, national and international levels.