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Participants shared best practices, common challenges, and promising innovations to end open defecation by 2025.

Members now benefit from automatic approval to join the WSSCC-hosted Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene (CoP) on LinkedIn

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WASH in the informal sector – Experiences of women from West and ...

Equality
In Niger, the lack of access to sanitation and scarcity of adequate information and facilities for Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) are considerable challenges for women, hindering their participation in society, a new study by WSSCC and UN/Women has found. The findings of the study were presented at a side event on Women’s access to sanitation and hygiene in the informal sector on March 20th, during the 61st Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) in New York.
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Mid-Term Review of WSSCC’s Medium-Term Strategic Plan 2012-2016 –...

WSSCC General
In 2015, the WSSCC commissioned a Mid-Term Review (MTR) of its Medium-Term Strategic Plan (MTSP) 2012-16 to assess its progress against intended results in the MTSP. The MTR was designed to contribute to organisational learning as well as to meet the accountability requirements of WSSCC’s Steering Committee and donors. The MTR covers the period 2012-2014, with additional analysis of progress made as part of the 2015-2016 Biennial Work Plan up to February 2016. The review was undertaken by IFMR LEAD and managed for quality assurance by the International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie) under the 3ie Sanitation and Hygiene Thematic Window.WSSCC has issued a Management Response to the recommendations in the review, with a comprehensive internal response plan developed for each recommendation, under the headings of Programme Strategy, Monitoring and Evaluation and Governance.
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Local governance and sanitation: Eight lessons from Uganda

Global Sanitation Fund
Many non-governmental and intergovernmental organizations, as well as bilateral and multilateral donors, recognize the importance of closely working with governments in sanitation and hygiene programmes. Collective behaviour change approaches, such as Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS), are also increasingly being embraced by governments as an alternative to traditional subsidy and enforcement-based approaches. This ‘GSF in focus’ case study presents eight lessons learned from the GSF-supported Uganda Sanitation Fund (USF) in coordinating, planning, and implementing CLTS at scale through a decentralized government system. The USF is the largest programme of its kind in Uganda. The programme, which began in 2011, is currently implemented by 30 District Local Governments under the overall management of the Ministry of Health. By September 2016, the USF reported helping over three million people live in open defecation free (ODF) environments.De nombreuses organisations non gouvernementales et intergouvernementales, ainsi que des donateurs bilatéraux et multilatéraux, reconnaissent l’importance de travailler en étroite collaboration avec les gouvernements dans le cadre des programmes d’assainissement et d’hygiène. Des approches collectives en matière de changement de comportement, telles que l’ATPC, sont de plus en plus adoptées par les gouvernements comme une alternative aux démarches traditionnelles axées sur les subventions et la répression. Cette étude de cas intitulée « Gros plan sur le GSF » présente huit enseignements tirés du programme du Fonds ougandais pour l’assainissement (USF) soutenu par le Fonds mondial pour l’assainissement (GSF) dans le cadre de la coordination, de la planification et de la mise en oeuvre de l’ATPC à grande échelle1 par l’intermédiaire d’un système administratif décentralisé. L’USF est le programme le plus important de ce genre en Ouganda. Débuté en 2011, il est actuellement mis en oeuvre par 30 gouvernements locaux de district2 sous la supervision du ministère de la Santé. En septembre 2016, l’USF a indiqué avoir aidé plus de trois millions de personnes à vivre dans un environnement exempt de défécation à l’air libre.
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Gender and Community-Led Total Sanitation – CLTS engagement, outc...

Global Sanitation Fund
In order to better understand the link between gender dynamics and the impact of its Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) interventions, the GSF supported a study in a small number of communities in Madagascar in 2015. These communities are in the area covered by the GSF-supported programme in Madagascar, known locally as ‘Fonds d’Appui pour l’Assainissement’ (FAA). This ‘GSF in focus’ case study highlights and reflects on the study.Cette étude examine le lien entre la dynamique du genre et l’initiative d’assainissement total piloté par la communauté (ATPC) dans un petit nombre de communautés malgaches.
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Applied research in water, sanitation and hygiene – Summary repor...

Collaboration
In October 2016, the WSSCC LinkedIn Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene in Developing Countries and the Centre of Excellence in Water and Sanitation at Mzuzu University came together to hold a joint 3‐week thematic discussion on applied research in water, sanitation and hygiene. The LinkedIn hosted CoP has over 6,200 members each working in WASH and other related sectors; this thematic discussion was an opportunity to bring together sector practitioners and researchers to share knowledge, learn from each other, identify best practice and explore links between research and practice in the sector. The first discussion was held from 3 to 9 October 2016 and focused on ‘How to pull practitioners into research.The second thematic discussion hosted by WSSCC and the Centre of Excellence in Water and Sanitation at Mzuzu University was held from 10 to 16 October 2016 and focused on ‘Low‐cost WASH technologies’. The discussion was led by Assistant Professor Dr. Abebe Beyene Hailu at Jimma University, Ethiopia.
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Sanitation and Hygiene Behaviour Change at Scale: Understanding S...

Global Sanitation Fund
As sanitation and hygiene programmes mature, the challenge shifts from bringing communities to ODF status to sustaining this status. In this context, many programmes are confronted with the issue of slippage. This concept refers to a return to previous unhygienic behaviours, or the inability of some or all community members to continue to meet all ODF criteria. This paper explores how to discern slippage nuances and patterns, strategies to address, pre-empt and mitigate it as well as alternative monitoring systems that capture the complexity of slippage more fully. The analysis and reflections are based on direct field experience, primarily from the GSF-supported programme in Madagascar. Moreover, the underpinning principle of the paper is that slippage is an expected aspect of behaviour change-oriented sanitation and hygiene interventions, especially those at scale, and not a sign of failure thereof.Modifier les comportements d’hygiène et d’assainissement à grande échelle – Comprendre la régression : Ce document de réflexion examine comment distinguer les nuances et les types de régression ; il étudie les stratégies qui visent à y répondre, à les prévenir et à les réduire ainsi que d’autres systèmes de suivi permettant de mieux appréhender la complexité de la régression. Les analyses et les réflexions reposent sur une expérience directe du terrain, provenant essentiellement du programme soutenu par le GSF à Madagascar. De plus, ce document est sous-tendu par un principe fondamental, à savoir que la régression est un aspect attendu des interventions en hygiène et assainissement qui sont axées sur la modification des comportements, surtout celles qui sont conduites à grande échelle, et qu’il ne s’agit pas d’un signe de l’échec de ces dernières.
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Nepal earthquake: Reviving sanitation – Global Sanitation Fund Le...

Global Sanitation Fund
Following the devastating 2015 earthquake in Nepal, the Global Sanitation Fund (GSF)-supported programme and partners underwent a significant learning journey, which has helped revive sanitation in the country. This journey is illustrated in a learning report produced by UN-Habitat, the GSF Executing Agency in Nepal.
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Leave No One Behind – Country Reports

Equality
Leave No One Behind - Afghanistan Country Report: This report is one in a series of 8 country reports produced as a result of the Leave No One Behind consultative process. It captures the current WASH practices, challenges and aspirations of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka vulnerable groups from Qarabagh, Paghman, Bagrami and Kabul districts of Kabul Province, Afghanistan.Leave No One Behind - Bangladesh Country Report: As part of the Leave No One Behind consultative process in South Asia, ten meetings were organised by the Bangladesh chapter of FANSA with women, adolescent girls, elderly, persons with disabilities, transgender people and sanitation workers and waste collectors in different parts of the country in collaboration with CSOs working with these groups.Leave No One Behind - Bhutan Country Report: This report is the outcome of a consultation with a group of women, adolescent girls, sanitation workers, people with disabilities and senior citizens, organised in Bhutan in November 2015 with support from FANSA and WSSCC. The purpose of this interaction was to gain an understanding of their current sanitation and hygiene status, practices and challenges in their daily life.Leave No One Behind - India Country Report: In India, eighteen consultation meetings were held across six states with participants from different vulnerable groups. A total of 999 people participated in these meetings, including 260 women and adolescent girls, 182 elderly people and persons with disabilities, 236 sanitation workers and waste pickers and 36 members of the transgender community. Modern Architects for Rural India (MARI) led the consultative process with the support of 30 local organisations.Leave No One Behind - Maldives Country Report: This report summarizes the main challenges as well as key asks of people with disabilities, adolescent school children, construction workers, fishermen, elderly and sanitation workers in Maldives with regard to access to hygiene and sanitation services. These groups raised their concerns in the consultation held by WaterCare in the Maldives National University at the initiative of FANSA and WSSCC.Leave No One Behind - Nepal Country Report: The consultations with vulnerable groups from different parts of the country was an opportunity to openly interact with individuals on their sanitation and hygiene experiences that are critical aspects of their well-being and dignity. Women and adolescent girls, elderly people, persons with disabilities and the sanitation workers actively participated in the consultations where they shared their life story and struggles without adequate sanitation facilities at the household level, at the workplace and in public places.Leave No One Behind - Pakistan Country Report: In Pakistan, a total of eight consultation meetings were held between October 29 and November 20, 2015 to capture the current WASH practices, the associated and coping strategies among women and adolescent girls, the elderly and disabled and sanitary workers and waste pickers. In total, 551 participants from urban, peri-urban, slums and rural parts of Pakistan participated in the consultations. They included 187 women and adolescent girls, 145 elderly and persons with disabilities, and 219 sanitation workers and waste segregators. The meetings were organized by Punjab Urban Resource Centre with support from 11 local partner organizations in eight districts of the country.Leave No One Behind – Sri Lanka Country Report: In Sri Lanka, six consultations were conducted with a total of 218 participants, including 75 sanitation workers, 55 plantation workers, 63 women, and 25 differently-abled people. Seven organizations representing the fishing community, plantation workers, persons with disabilities and municipal councils supported CEJ in organizing these consultations. Participants were given an opportunity to share their experiences and observations on WASH issues using participatory methods. This report captures the major points shared by these groups.