Latest News

10 principles for ensuring that disadvantaged people benefit effectively from sanitation programmes and processes

Study confirms that disadvantaged groups have benefited from Global Sanitation Fund (GSF)-supported programmes, but more proactive attention is needed

Gender equality, serving the most vulnerable, and addressing the particular needs of women and girls are among the core principles of the GSF.

Resources

Gender and Community-Led Total Sanitation – CLTS engagement, outc...

Global Sanitation Fund
In order to better understand the link between gender dynamics and the impact of its Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) interventions, the GSF supported a study in a small number of communities in Madagascar in 2015. These communities are in the area covered by the GSF-supported programme in Madagascar, known locally as ‘Fonds d’Appui pour l’Assainissement’ (FAA). This ‘GSF in focus’ case study highlights and reflects on the study.Cette étude examine le lien entre la dynamique du genre et l’initiative d’assainissement total piloté par la communauté (ATPC) dans un petit nombre de communautés malgaches.

Sanitation, Stress, and Life Stage: A Systematic Data Collection ...

Equality
Emerging evidence demonstrates how inadequate access to water and sanitation is linked to psychosocial stress, especially among women, forcing them to navigate social and physical barriers during their daily sanitation routines. This study examines sanitation-related psychosocial stress (SRPS) across women’s reproductive lives in three distinct geographic sites (urban slums, rural villages, and rural tribal villages) in Odisha, India. It explores daily sanitation practices of adolescent, newly married, pregnant, and established adult women and identified stressors encountered during sanitation.

Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) – Studies on Behaviour and Pra...

Equality
At present, there are no public policies in West or Central Africa mentioning menstrual hygiene management. Under the UN Women/Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) joint programme, ˮGender, Hygiene and Sanitationˮ a survey, combined with focus groups discussion and interviews, was conducted in the Louga region of Senegal, in June 2014. The outcomes of this study provided critical information about menstrual hygiene management knowledge and practices in the region.Briefing Note – Menstrual Hygiene Management Behaviour and Practices in the Louga Region, SenegalÉtude – Gestion de l’hygiène menstruelle – Comportements et pratiques dans la région de Louga, SénégalNote de synthèse – Gestion de l’hygiène menstruelle – Comportements et pratiques dans la région de Louga, SénégalThe study of menstrual hygiene management in the Kedougou region (Senegal) is the second in a series of research studies undertaken by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) and UN Women as part of the Joint Programme on Gender, Hygiene and Sanitation in West and Central Africa. Available information on menstrual hygiene management, (MHM) is extremely limited and behaviour and practices are largely undocumented. The study’s main objective is to establish a database of information on public policies, behaviour and practices with regard to menstrual hygiene management and to analyse their impact on the living conditions of women and girls in this largely rural and impoverished region of Senegal.Briefing Note – Menstrual Hygiene Management Behaviour and Practices in the Kedougou Region, SenegalÉtude – Gestion de l’hygiène menstruelle – Comportements et pratiques dans la région de Kédougou, SénégalNote de synthèse – Gestion de l’hygiène menstruelle – Comportements et pratiques dans la région de Kédougou, SénégalThis study is the third in a series by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) and UN Women within the Joint Programme on Gender, Hygiene and Sanitation in West and Central Africa. The study focused on two localities with different socio-cultural profiles: Kye-Ossi in the south and Bamoungoum in the west. It reports on the current state of MHM-related practices and behaviours and analyses infrastructure and public policies. Additionally the study investigates the availability and relevance of information on MHM and evaluates the impact of the situation on people’s living conditions, their health, educational levels and the employment of women and girls.Briefing note – Menstrual Hygiene Management Behaviour and Practices in the Kye-Ossi and Bamoungoum Regions, Cameroon – Findings and recommendationsÉtude – Gestion de l’hygiène menstruelle dans les régions de Kyé-Ossi et Bamoungoum, CamerounNote de synthèse – Gestion de l’hygiène menstruelle dans les régions de Kyé-Ossi et Bamoungoum, Cameroun

A Systematic Review of the Health and Social Effects of Menstrual...

Equality
Menstruation is a natural and beneficial monthly occurrence in healthy adolescent girls and pre-menopausal adult women. It concerns women and men alike as it is among the key determinants of human reproduction and parenthood. Differing approaches to menstrual hygiene management (MHM) have been associated with a wide range of health and psycho-social outcomes in lower income settings. This paper collates, summarizes and critically appraises the peer-reviewed and published evidence on the health and psycho-social outcomes of the methods of MHM used in low and middle income countries and to assess the evidence for existing interventions such as educational programs and absorbent distribution.