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Sanitation, Stress, and Life Stage: A Systematic Data Collection ...

Equality
Emerging evidence demonstrates how inadequate access to water and sanitation is linked to psychosocial stress, especially among women, forcing them to navigate social and physical barriers during their daily sanitation routines. This study examines sanitation-related psychosocial stress (SRPS) across women’s reproductive lives in three distinct geographic sites (urban slums, rural villages, and rural tribal villages) in Odisha, India. It explores daily sanitation practices of adolescent, newly married, pregnant, and established adult women and identified stressors encountered during sanitation.

Sanitation for a Better Cambodia – The Cambodia Rural Sanitation ...

Global Sanitation Fund
Regionally and globally, Cambodia has comparatively low levels of access to basic sanitation and hygiene in rural areas. Lack of access is widely recognized as a cause for the spread of disease and economic loss for countries. In Cambodia, diarrhoea is indeed a major factor for the country’s child death, which remains relatively high, despite significant decrease to 54 deaths per 1000 live births in 2013. In 2010, Cambodia was selected as a focus country for programmes to improve access to sanitation and hygiene by the Global Sanitation Fund (GSF). GSF partners work closely with government sanitation and hygiene programmes and other water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) stakeholders to implement transformative programmes focused on 4 three core principles: national leadership; targeting poor and unserved communities; and ensuring interventions are people-centered, community-managed, and demand-driven. The CR-SHIP partnership, led by Plan Cambodia as the Executing Agency, includes sub-grantees selected from government agencies, local authorities, local and international NGOs, and individuals or private firms with experience and competence in the sector. The programme promotes sanitation and hygiene behavior change through five effective approaches: CLTS, school and community water, sanitation and hygiene (SC-WASH) and sanitation marketing, behavior change communication (BCC), and information, education and communication materials.

Hand Washing Practice in ASEH Project Area – A Study for Impact M...

Collaboration
This study examines the status and benefits of hand washing with cleaning agents at five critical times as part of the Advancing Sustainable Environmental Health (ASEH) project. It was the third part of a longitudinal study of a project in rural and urban areas of Bangladesh with an earlier baseline (2004) and mid-term impact study (2007). It was designed using an iterative Cluster Sampling Technique. The study reveals that knowledge about critical hand washing times increased significantly in both rural and urban areas at all five critical hand washing times, except for two critical times related to children in rural areas. Of respondents in rural and urban areas, 27% and 63% respectively have knowledge about all five critical times. Hand washing at these critical times increased in rural and urban areas, with the exception of hand washing before feeding young children in rural areas. Notably, 27% of people in rural and 32% of people in urban areas reported washing their hands properly at all five critical times. This paper was presented at the Hygiene Practitioners Workshop, Dhaka, Bangladesh, February 2010.