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Alétan is the first Open Defecation Free village supported by the Global Sanitation Fund in Benin

The GSF supports partners to address the global sanitation and hygiene crisis, so that everyone can enjoy healthy and productive lives.

For SWA’s HLMs 2017 Chris Williams argues that governments should be investing in disease prevention

The dangers of open defecation are explained in the campaign, with messages delivered by local celebrities

Obanliku Local Government Area (LGA) in Cross River State, Nigeria is the first of the 774 LGAs in the country to achieve open defecation free (ODF) status

We list some of our studies that evidence the links between poor sanitation and psycho-social stress

The universal nature of psycho social stress related to poor or inadequate sanitation is raised in this webinar

Once we understand the complexities of slippage and the strategies to address it, how do we – as WASH practitioners – move forward?

The GSF invests in behaviour change activities that enable people to improve their sanitation

Submitted by our member Daniel Karanja, this story reveals how one woman took matters into her own hands to ensure that CLTS reached her home.

When WASH practitioners understand the patterns and causes of slippage, they can devise innovative strategies to avoid it.

Global Sanitation Fund programmes are designed to incorporate gender considerations and equity dimensions.

Resources

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Sanitation and Hygiene Behaviour Change at Scale: Understanding S...

Global Sanitation Fund
As sanitation and hygiene programmes mature, the challenge shifts from bringing communities to ODF status to sustaining this status. In this context, many programmes are confronted with the issue of slippage. This concept refers to a return to previous unhygienic behaviours, or the inability of some or all community members to continue to meet all ODF criteria. This paper explores how to discern slippage nuances and patterns, strategies to address, pre-empt and mitigate it as well as alternative monitoring systems that capture the complexity of slippage more fully. The analysis and reflections are based on direct field experience, primarily from the GSF-supported programme in Madagascar. Moreover, the underpinning principle of the paper is that slippage is an expected aspect of behaviour change-oriented sanitation and hygiene interventions, especially those at scale, and not a sign of failure thereof.Modifier les comportements d’hygiène et d’assainissement à grande échelle – Comprendre la régression : Ce document de réflexion examine comment distinguer les nuances et les types de régression ; il étudie les stratégies qui visent à y répondre, à les prévenir et à les réduire ainsi que d’autres systèmes de suivi permettant de mieux appréhender la complexité de la régression. Les analyses et les réflexions reposent sur une expérience directe du terrain, provenant essentiellement du programme soutenu par le GSF à Madagascar. De plus, ce document est sous-tendu par un principe fondamental, à savoir que la régression est un aspect attendu des interventions en hygiène et assainissement qui sont axées sur la modification des comportements, surtout celles qui sont conduites à grande échelle, et qu’il ne s’agit pas d’un signe de l’échec de ces dernières.
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GSF partners in action: Boosting WASH for schools and communities...

Global Sanitation Fund
“In the past, pupils used to skip classes as well as get sick very often. Pupils who would come to school one day were usually not the same ones the next day. And again, some of the girl students approaching adolescence were mostly shy at school when menstruating since there was no proper structures to support them. As a result, many of them dropped out.” In the open defecation free (ODF) Traditional Authority of Mwadzama, a Plan International project under the GSF-supported programme in Malawi has boosted water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) in schools. The project ensured the installation of boreholes and improved latrines, established school wash clubs and competitions, and supported community sanitation and hygiene campaigns. Since the start of the project school enrollment has also increased, which may be linked to project’s outputs.
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Sustainable Sanitation For All – Case studies by Elizabeth Wamera...

Collaboration
Great strides have been made in improving sanitation in many developing countries. Yet, 2.4 billion people worldwide still lack access to adequate sanitation facilities and the poorest and most vulnerable members of society are often not reached and their specific needs are not met. Moreover, sustainability is currently one of the key challenges in CLTS and wider WASH practice, subsuming issues such as behaviour change, equity and inclusion, physical sustainability and sanitation marketing, monitoring and verification, engagement of governments, NGOs and donors, particularly after open defecation free (ODF) status is reached, and more. There have been several useful studies on sustainability that have highlighted some of these different aspects as well as the complexities involved. This book develops these key themes by exploring current experience, practices, challenges, innovations and insights, as well as identifying a future research agenda and gaps in current knowledge.WSSCC’s Elizabeth Wamera, Civil Society and National Engagement Officer’s chapter on post-ODF management process by the community is available for download from the book “Sustainable Sanitation for all: Experiences, challenges and innovations”. The chapter Who is managing the post-ODF process in the community? A case study of Nambale sub-county in Western Kenya, is based on the success of Nambale sub-county, which was declared ODF in 2012, and looks at the role of Community Health Workers (CHWs), discussing challenges that could be threatening ODF achievement and sustainability. As post-ODF follow-up is central to sustaining open defecation free (ODF) status, and needs to be integrated into CLTS programming from the outset, the chapter explores the responsibilities of carrying out these activities, and how they might be motivated and financed. The CLTS Knowledge Hub's newly launched book describes the landscape of the sustainability of Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) and sanitation with references to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and through examples from Africa and Asia. Featured in the book are a range of experiences and innovations from institutions and actors within the WASH sector attempting to make recommendations and practical suggestions for policy and practice for practitioners, funders, policymakers and governments.Sustainable Development Goal Target 6.2 aims, by 2030, to achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and end open defecation (OD), paying special attention to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations. If we are serious about leaving no one behind, we will need to put human beings first, and infrastructure designed to serve them second. Many individuals and groups cannot use sanitation and hygiene facilities due to physical or societal restrictions placed on them by their gender, disability, age, caste, religion, gender, or poverty. Non-discrimination should be embedded into policy and practice, so that people’s realities, needs, and demands are clearly articulated and matched with budgets, adapted public facilities on the ground, more equitable sharing of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) burdens, and systematic, meaningful participation in decision-making and monitoring. This chapter summarizes the testimonies and aspirations of individuals across a number of Asian countries who were never asked what they need and who are excluded from services. They remind us that in order to leave no one behind we will need to listen to them, involve them fully at all key stages, and forge true partnerships to achieve shared goals.
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Global Sanitation Fund Progress Report 2015

Global Sanitation Fund
The 2015 GSF Progress Report provides a comprehensive overview and analysis of the Fund’s activities and performance in 2015. The latest information on the GSF’s structure and concepts at the date of publication of this report is also provided, as they relate to its work in 2015. Through regular reporting, WSSCC aims to provide a clear impression of the GSF’s current and planned impact. WSSCC encourages support for the GSF and welcomes critical analysis of the Fund's key results and activities. Key sections in the report include: a message from the GSF Programme Director; highlights and achievements; how the Fund works; highlights from all 13 GSF-supported country programmes; and feature stories and testimonials from the people and partners central to the Fund. 2015 was a year of considerable progress, learning and innovation for country programmes, and the Fund as a whole. Since the GSF was established, over $112 million has been committed for 13 country programmes. These commitments, and the work of thousands of partners and champions, have enabled 10.87 million people to live in open defecation free environments; 6.62 million to gain access to improved toilets; and 15.69 million to gain access to handwashing facilities.Cette publication donne une vue d’ensemble globale des activités menées par le GSF en 2015 et analyse ses performances pour cette année. Elle comprend également les informations les plus récentes quant à la structure du GSF et aux concepts utiles à la date de la publication du présent rapport, puisque celles-ci se rapportent aux travaux du GSF en 2015. Par le biais de rapports réguliers, le WSSCC a pour but de dresser un tableau clair de l’impact actuel et prévu du GSF. Le WSSCC vous encourage à soutenir le GSF et vous invite à lui adresser toute analyse critique des résultats et activités. L’année 2015 a été marquée par des progrès considérables, de nombreux enseignements et de grandes innovations pour les programmes que soutient le GSF et pour le Fonds dans son ensemble. Depuis la création du GSF, plus de 112 millions de dollars ont été affectés à 13 programmes de pays. Ces engagements financiers et le travail de nos milliers de partenaires et de champions ont permis au GSF d’engranger des résultats probants. 10,87 millions de personnes peuvent vivre dans un environnement exempt de défécation à l’air libre. De plus, 6,62 millions de personnes ont accès à des toilettes améliorées et 15,69 millions de personnes ont accès à des installations pour se laver les mains.
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Follow-up MANDONA: A field guide for accelerating and sustaining ...

Global Sanitation Fund
Follow-up MANDONA (FUM) is an action-oriented, collective approach for post-triggering follow-up visits, as part of Community-Led Total Sanitation. The FUM approach was pioneered by MIARINTSOA NGO – a sub-grantee of the GSF-supported ‘Fonds d’Appui pour l’Assainissement’ programme in Madagascar. FUM brings the entire community together for a self-analysis of their sanitation situation and helps them immediately create models that prevent the ingestion of faeces. The approach then harnesses the power of Natural Leaders to replicate these models across the community, which includes helping those that are least able, in order to advance to open defecation free status. By focusing on sustainable behaviour change, FUM is also a useful tool for addressing issues surrounding ‘slippage’, which relates to returning to previous unhygienic behaviours. Illustrated with photos, case studies, and tips, this handbook provides a practical, step-by-step guide for how CLTS practitioners around the world can implement FUM in their own contexts.Follow-up MANDONA - Un guide de terrain pour accélérer et soutenir le mouvement des communautés exemptes de défécation à l’air libre grâce à une approche d’Assainissement total piloté par la communauté (ATPC)
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Togo Progress Report – Global Sanitation Fund

Global Sanitation Fund
The GSF-funded programme in Togo supports the country’s national campaign to become open defecation free (ODF), known as ‘Togo SANDAL’. The aim of the GSF-funded programme is to increase the use of latrines and to encourage the adoption of good hygiene practices for rural populations in the Savanes and Kara regions, and in five districts in the Plateaux region. In particular, the programme aims to help 1.5 million people create the conditions to live in ODF communities, 1.2 million people access improved toilets, and 911,000 access and use handwashing facilities.
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Global Sanitation Fund Progress Update – August 2015

Global Sanitation Fund
In the first half of 2015, Global Sanitation Fund (GSF)-supported programmes reported significant progress in helping large numbers of people improve their sanitation and adopt good hygiene practices. Over 9.9 million people in more than 36,500 communities now live in open defecation free (ODF) environments, an increase of approximately 2.9 million people since December 2014.Fonds Mondial pour l’Assainissement - Rapport d’avancement – Mis à jour en août 2015 - Au premier semestre 2015, les programmes soutenus par le Fonds Mondial pour l’Assainissement (GSF) ont enregistré d’importants progrès sur le plan de l’aide apportée à de nombreuses personnes pour leur permettre d’accéder à des services d’assainissement sûrs et d’adopter de bonnes pratiques d’hygiène. Plus de 9,9 millions de personnes dans plus de 36 500 communautés vivent désormais dans des environnements exempts de défécation à l’air libre (FDAL), soit une augmentation de près de 2,9 millions de personnes depuis décembre 2014. En outre, plus de 8,2 millions de personnes ont accès à des toilettes améliorées, soit une augmentation de près de 4 millions depuis décembre 2014. Par ailleurs, plus de 77 400 communautés ont participé à des activités de déclenchement visant à améliorer les comportements et à augmenter la demande d’assainissement et d’hygiène.
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10 reasons to partner with the Global Sanitation Fund

Global Sanitation Fund
The Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) invests in behaviour change activities that enable large numbers of people in developing countries to improve their sanitation and adopt good hygiene practices. Established in 2008 by the UNOPS-hosted Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC), the GSF is the only global fund solely dedicated to sanitation and hygiene. The GSF is community-based, government-supported and commercially operated. Households and local governments work with local entrepreneurs and a network of hundreds of partners. Together, they create the conditions for tens of millions of people to live in open defecation free environments and access adequate toilets and handwashing facilities. Discover the 10 reasons to partner with the GSF in this brochure.