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The universal nature of psycho social stress related to poor or inadequate sanitation is raised in this webinar

Global Sanitation Fund programmes are designed to incorporate gender considerations and equity dimensions.

The podcast encourages discussion on menstrual and feminine hygiene issues and the right to sanitation for women and girls.

With SDG 6.2 at its heart, the strategy identifies the results WSSCC would like to achieve, the issues it will work on and regions where it will work

WSSCC Member Daniel Iroegbu’s inspirational work is impacting the lives of women and girls in hard-to-reach areas of the country.

Join us at CSW in New York for the findings of a new study on the sanitation and hygiene needs of women working in the informal sector in Niger.

The event included able and disabled women and girls, who traveled from many parts of Nepal to share their real-life experiences.

Do you know what the stress points are for women and girls in their daily sanitation routines? How do they cope? Join our March 2nd webinar.

The review was undertaken by IFMR LEAD and managed for quality assurance by the International Initiative for Impact Evaluation.

In Agelilyec, community members are supporting disadvantaged groups as part of a larger effort to keep their village open defecation free.

WSSCC is working to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 6.2, to provide sanitation and hygiene for all, and does this in a number of ways.

The WSSCC family extends its congratulations to Amina J. Mohammed on her nomination to serve as Deputy Secretary-General of the UN.

Resources

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CSW61 Side Event: Women’s Access to Sanitation and Hygiene in Inf...

Equality
On March 20th, 2017 the Permanent Missions of Niger and Singapore to the United Nations in New York hosted an event on the sidelines of the 61st Commission on the Status of Women. Co-organized by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) and UN Women, this event highlighted the daily sanitation and hygiene challenges faced by women and girls in the informal economy. Read the event report here.Briefing note for the side event at CSW61 in New York on Women’s Access to Sanitation and Hygiene in the Informal Sector. Includes experiences of active women in West and Central Africa with findings from Cameroon, Niger and Senegal.
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WSSCC Women’s Week 2017 – Social media package

Equality
Did you know that women, on average, menstruate 3,000 days in their lifetime? Join us in celebrating International Women's Day on March 8 by sharing our MHM factoid and our member story in English and in French.
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Mid-Term Review of WSSCC’s Medium-Term Strategic Plan 2012-2016 –...

WSSCC General
In 2015, the WSSCC commissioned a Mid-Term Review (MTR) of its Medium-Term Strategic Plan (MTSP) 2012-16 to assess its progress against intended results in the MTSP. The MTR was designed to contribute to organisational learning as well as to meet the accountability requirements of WSSCC’s Steering Committee and donors. The MTR covers the period 2012-2014, with additional analysis of progress made as part of the 2015-2016 Biennial Work Plan up to February 2016. The review was undertaken by IFMR LEAD and managed for quality assurance by the International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie) under the 3ie Sanitation and Hygiene Thematic Window.WSSCC has issued a Management Response to the recommendations in the review, with a comprehensive internal response plan developed for each recommendation, under the headings of Programme Strategy, Monitoring and Evaluation and Governance.
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Sanitation Action Summit 2016 – Reflections

Sanitation Action Summit
The Sanitation Action Summit in Mumbai brought together policymakers, representatives from marginalized communities, and global citizens to share experiences and identify solutions that help enable a truly open defecation free India by 2019. This report describes how the summit came about, and who came to listen, share and learn. It also highlights the challenges faced and opportunities present for achieving equitable, safe sanitation and hygiene for all in India.
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Leave No One Behind – Country Reports

Equality
Leave No One Behind - Afghanistan Country Report: This report is one in a series of 8 country reports produced as a result of the Leave No One Behind consultative process. It captures the current WASH practices, challenges and aspirations of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka vulnerable groups from Qarabagh, Paghman, Bagrami and Kabul districts of Kabul Province, Afghanistan.Leave No One Behind - Bangladesh Country Report: As part of the Leave No One Behind consultative process in South Asia, ten meetings were organised by the Bangladesh chapter of FANSA with women, adolescent girls, elderly, persons with disabilities, transgender people and sanitation workers and waste collectors in different parts of the country in collaboration with CSOs working with these groups.Leave No One Behind - Bhutan Country Report: This report is the outcome of a consultation with a group of women, adolescent girls, sanitation workers, people with disabilities and senior citizens, organised in Bhutan in November 2015 with support from FANSA and WSSCC. The purpose of this interaction was to gain an understanding of their current sanitation and hygiene status, practices and challenges in their daily life.Leave No One Behind - India Country Report: In India, eighteen consultation meetings were held across six states with participants from different vulnerable groups. A total of 999 people participated in these meetings, including 260 women and adolescent girls, 182 elderly people and persons with disabilities, 236 sanitation workers and waste pickers and 36 members of the transgender community. Modern Architects for Rural India (MARI) led the consultative process with the support of 30 local organisations.Leave No One Behind - Maldives Country Report: This report summarizes the main challenges as well as key asks of people with disabilities, adolescent school children, construction workers, fishermen, elderly and sanitation workers in Maldives with regard to access to hygiene and sanitation services. These groups raised their concerns in the consultation held by WaterCare in the Maldives National University at the initiative of FANSA and WSSCC.Leave No One Behind - Nepal Country Report: The consultations with vulnerable groups from different parts of the country was an opportunity to openly interact with individuals on their sanitation and hygiene experiences that are critical aspects of their well-being and dignity. Women and adolescent girls, elderly people, persons with disabilities and the sanitation workers actively participated in the consultations where they shared their life story and struggles without adequate sanitation facilities at the household level, at the workplace and in public places.Leave No One Behind - Pakistan Country Report: In Pakistan, a total of eight consultation meetings were held between October 29 and November 20, 2015 to capture the current WASH practices, the associated and coping strategies among women and adolescent girls, the elderly and disabled and sanitary workers and waste pickers. In total, 551 participants from urban, peri-urban, slums and rural parts of Pakistan participated in the consultations. They included 187 women and adolescent girls, 145 elderly and persons with disabilities, and 219 sanitation workers and waste segregators. The meetings were organized by Punjab Urban Resource Centre with support from 11 local partner organizations in eight districts of the country.Leave No One Behind – Sri Lanka Country Report: In Sri Lanka, six consultations were conducted with a total of 218 participants, including 75 sanitation workers, 55 plantation workers, 63 women, and 25 differently-abled people. Seven organizations representing the fishing community, plantation workers, persons with disabilities and municipal councils supported CEJ in organizing these consultations. Participants were given an opportunity to share their experiences and observations on WASH issues using participatory methods. This report captures the major points shared by these groups.
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WSSCC at Women Deliver 2016

Equality
Download the full programme below to find out more about our events at this year's Women Deliver conference in Copenhagen, Denmark. As a leading, global advocate for girls’ and women’s health, rights, and wellbeing, Women Deliver brings together diverse voices and interests to drive progress in maternal, sexual, and reproductive health and rights. We build capacity, share solutions, and forge partnerships, together creating coalitions, communication, and action that spark political commitment and investment in girls and women. For more information on Women Deliver, visit www.wd2016.org.
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National Coordinators Report – Highlights 2015

Collaboration
Sixteen National Coordinators work within WASH coalitions in their home countries, leading WSSCC’s work, serving as coalition heads and spokespersons, and advocating on WASH issues. National Coordinators carry out national and local level networking, knowledge management, advocacy and communications activities, and working on facilitating and implementing Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) programme activities. Working with partners and networks, they aim to position sanitation and hygiene onto the national agenda and prioritize specific investments for sanitation and hygiene. This report shows how WSSCC's National Coordinators have increased the visibility of WSSCC in their respective countries and how their collective commitment has contributed to greater commitments from rights holders, duty bearers, the private sector and partners.Rapport des coordinateurs nationaux 2015 - Les coordinateurs nationaux du WSSCC sont actifs dans 16 pays d’Asie du Sud-Est, d’Afrique de l’Ouest, d’Asie du Sud et d’Afrique orientale et australe. En 2015, ils ont pu faciliter et entreprendre des activités variées, qui illustrent l’activisme local et mondial en faveur du secteur WASH, et le dynamisme de l’approche collaborative du WSSCC. Avec l’adoption des objectifs de développement durable (ODD) en septembre 2015, les coordinateurs nationaux continuent de contribuer à ce secteur en portant davantage attention aux questions d’expansion et d’équité, conformément aux nouveaux objectifs. Ils canalisent les efforts des coalitions WASH et des autorités publiques pour mettre fin à la pratique de la défécation à l’air libre, et veillent à ce que les améliorations sanitaires soient adaptées aux personnes vulnérables et aux groupes socialement marginalisés. Pour se concentrer sur l’expansion et l’équité, ils s’appuient sur les résultats et l’expérience des 13 programmes nationaux d’amélioration de l’assainissement et de l’hygiène soutenus par le GSF ainsi que sur les activités du WSSCC relatives à l’égalité et à la non-discrimination.
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Leave No One Behind: Voices of Women, Adolescent Girls, Elderly a...

Equality
“Leave No One Behind” summarizes the sanitation and hygiene hopes and aspirations of thousands of women and men of different ages and physical ability, across rural and urban areas in eight South Asian countries. In these countries, over a billion people are without safe sanitation. They represent indi­viduals and groups rarely heard because they are seldom asked what their constraints are, what they need, how they cope and how they might design services differently to enable universal access and use.Poster - WomenPoster - GirlsPoster - InfantsPoster - ChildrenPoster - CaregiversPoster - Pregnant womenPoster - Women workers