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On International Women’s Day, Chris Williams writes that there is more to adding women to the workplace; they need an enabling space

The event included able and disabled women and girls, who traveled from many parts of Nepal to share their real-life experiences.

The analysis provides recommendations on the methodology that the GSF can use to better track VfM aspects within supported programmes.

Find out what steps some of our members recently took to inspire change in their communities.

A panel of experts discussed equal access to sanitation and hygiene in public spaces.

In June, July and August WSSCC reached out to its members and partners in 16 countries through dedicated national consultations.

The reports cover the sanitation needs of vulnerable groups in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

After the earthquake in Nepal, the GSF-supported programme & partners underwent a learning journey, which is illustrated in a new report.

The role of champions and partners is central to the success of GSF-supported programmes.

Interactive sessions generated responses on the role that WSSCC can play to contribute to progress in the country.

The sixth South Asia Conference on Sanitation (Sacosan-VI) – the region’s leading water and sanitation hygiene (WASH) forum – is taking place in Bangladesh’s capital, Dhaka from 11-13 January, 2016. Supported by the eight-member South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (Saarc) and held on a rotational basis in each member state, Sacosan is a biennial […]

On Tuesday, November 24th, WSSCC and 3ie hosted a discussion on how evaluation partnerships can be effective for achieving development impact, and for bridging the gap between evaluators and policymakers. Held as a side event at the Evaluation Conclave 2015 in Kathmandu, Nepal, the event showcased the critical nature of multi-sectoral, multi-agency collaborations in the […]

Resources

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Value for Money Study in Global Sanitation Fund Programmes – Synt...

Global Sanitation Fund
With maturing programmes and results steadily growing, the GSF is not only interested in the real cost of reaching results, but also in deepening its understanding of resources invested by communities, governments, and other partners. This is critical in further developing a model for scaling up sanitation and hygiene. With these aspects in mind, a multi-country value for money study was commissioned by the GSF in 2015, and carried out by Oxford Policy Management. This synthesis report explores the methodology and findings from the study. Moreover, it provides recommendations on the methodology which the GSF can utilize to track better value for money aspects within supported programmes.
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Nepal earthquake: Reviving sanitation – Global Sanitation Fund Le...

Global Sanitation Fund
Following the devastating 2015 earthquake in Nepal, the Global Sanitation Fund (GSF)-supported programme and partners underwent a significant learning journey, which has helped revive sanitation in the country. This journey is illustrated in a learning report produced by UN-Habitat, the GSF Executing Agency in Nepal.
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Leave No One Behind – Country Reports

Equality
Leave No One Behind - Afghanistan Country Report: This report is one in a series of 8 country reports produced as a result of the Leave No One Behind consultative process. It captures the current WASH practices, challenges and aspirations of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka vulnerable groups from Qarabagh, Paghman, Bagrami and Kabul districts of Kabul Province, Afghanistan.Leave No One Behind - Bangladesh Country Report: As part of the Leave No One Behind consultative process in South Asia, ten meetings were organised by the Bangladesh chapter of FANSA with women, adolescent girls, elderly, persons with disabilities, transgender people and sanitation workers and waste collectors in different parts of the country in collaboration with CSOs working with these groups.Leave No One Behind - Bhutan Country Report: This report is the outcome of a consultation with a group of women, adolescent girls, sanitation workers, people with disabilities and senior citizens, organised in Bhutan in November 2015 with support from FANSA and WSSCC. The purpose of this interaction was to gain an understanding of their current sanitation and hygiene status, practices and challenges in their daily life.Leave No One Behind - India Country Report: In India, eighteen consultation meetings were held across six states with participants from different vulnerable groups. A total of 999 people participated in these meetings, including 260 women and adolescent girls, 182 elderly people and persons with disabilities, 236 sanitation workers and waste pickers and 36 members of the transgender community. Modern Architects for Rural India (MARI) led the consultative process with the support of 30 local organisations.Leave No One Behind - Maldives Country Report: This report summarizes the main challenges as well as key asks of people with disabilities, adolescent school children, construction workers, fishermen, elderly and sanitation workers in Maldives with regard to access to hygiene and sanitation services. These groups raised their concerns in the consultation held by WaterCare in the Maldives National University at the initiative of FANSA and WSSCC.Leave No One Behind - Nepal Country Report: The consultations with vulnerable groups from different parts of the country was an opportunity to openly interact with individuals on their sanitation and hygiene experiences that are critical aspects of their well-being and dignity. Women and adolescent girls, elderly people, persons with disabilities and the sanitation workers actively participated in the consultations where they shared their life story and struggles without adequate sanitation facilities at the household level, at the workplace and in public places.Leave No One Behind - Pakistan Country Report: In Pakistan, a total of eight consultation meetings were held between October 29 and November 20, 2015 to capture the current WASH practices, the associated and coping strategies among women and adolescent girls, the elderly and disabled and sanitary workers and waste pickers. In total, 551 participants from urban, peri-urban, slums and rural parts of Pakistan participated in the consultations. They included 187 women and adolescent girls, 145 elderly and persons with disabilities, and 219 sanitation workers and waste segregators. The meetings were organized by Punjab Urban Resource Centre with support from 11 local partner organizations in eight districts of the country.Leave No One Behind – Sri Lanka Country Report: In Sri Lanka, six consultations were conducted with a total of 218 participants, including 75 sanitation workers, 55 plantation workers, 63 women, and 25 differently-abled people. Seven organizations representing the fishing community, plantation workers, persons with disabilities and municipal councils supported CEJ in organizing these consultations. Participants were given an opportunity to share their experiences and observations on WASH issues using participatory methods. This report captures the major points shared by these groups.
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Global Sanitation Fund Mid Term Evaluation – Synthesis Note

Global Sanitation Fund
In 2013, the GSF commissioned a mid-term evaluation of 10 of the national programmes it supports. This report is a synthesis 7 completed evaluation reports covering GSF-supported programmes in Cambodia, India, Madagascar, Malawi, Nepal, Senegal and Uganda. WSSCC, which operates the GSF, issued a response to the main observations in the synthesis report, including specific follow up actions the Council will take in the coming year.WSSCC’s Management Response to the Global Sanitation Fund Independent Mid-Term Evaluation Synthesis Report
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National Coordinators Report – Highlights 2015

Collaboration
Sixteen National Coordinators work within WASH coalitions in their home countries, leading WSSCC’s work, serving as coalition heads and spokespersons, and advocating on WASH issues. National Coordinators carry out national and local level networking, knowledge management, advocacy and communications activities, and working on facilitating and implementing Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) programme activities. Working with partners and networks, they aim to position sanitation and hygiene onto the national agenda and prioritize specific investments for sanitation and hygiene. This report shows how WSSCC's National Coordinators have increased the visibility of WSSCC in their respective countries and how their collective commitment has contributed to greater commitments from rights holders, duty bearers, the private sector and partners.Rapport des coordinateurs nationaux 2015 - Les coordinateurs nationaux du WSSCC sont actifs dans 16 pays d’Asie du Sud-Est, d’Afrique de l’Ouest, d’Asie du Sud et d’Afrique orientale et australe. En 2015, ils ont pu faciliter et entreprendre des activités variées, qui illustrent l’activisme local et mondial en faveur du secteur WASH, et le dynamisme de l’approche collaborative du WSSCC. Avec l’adoption des objectifs de développement durable (ODD) en septembre 2015, les coordinateurs nationaux continuent de contribuer à ce secteur en portant davantage attention aux questions d’expansion et d’équité, conformément aux nouveaux objectifs. Ils canalisent les efforts des coalitions WASH et des autorités publiques pour mettre fin à la pratique de la défécation à l’air libre, et veillent à ce que les améliorations sanitaires soient adaptées aux personnes vulnérables et aux groupes socialement marginalisés. Pour se concentrer sur l’expansion et l’équité, ils s’appuient sur les résultats et l’expérience des 13 programmes nationaux d’amélioration de l’assainissement et de l’hygiène soutenus par le GSF ainsi que sur les activités du WSSCC relatives à l’égalité et à la non-discrimination.
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Equity and Inclusion in Sanitation and Hygiene in South Asia – A ...

Equality
There are two facets to the problem in South Asia, both of which are unacceptable. The first is a problem of scale: 716 million men, women, and children defecate in the open every day in South Asia, especially in rural areas: a veritable sanitation crisis that impairs progress in the region. Many districts in India, Nepal, and Pakistan fall in this category. The second, and in many ways more pernicious problem, particularly in South Asia, is one of exclusion, where different categories of people are not able to access and use safe sanitation facilities. These categories of people include those who are socially and economically marginalized or excluded, and those who cannot use standard designs. This catalytic working paper, including a bibliography, was developed for the Technical Session during the 4th South Asian Conference on Sanitation (SACOSAN IV) Reaching the Unserved: Equity and Inclusion in South Asia. It is intended for discussion leading to collaborative action.
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WASH Case Studies Series – Nepal

Collaboration
The Nepal WASH Coalition was formed in 2003 to serve a country where less than half of the population uses adequate sanitation facilities. Ranking low on the human poverty index means that Nepal faces major hurdles in ensuring a basic standard of living, including sustainable access to adequate sanitation, for its population. To reach the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for water and sanitation by 2015 would require the construction of at least 14,000 latrines every month until 2015. In this case study, part of the series analyzing individual countries, we examine how the Nepal WASH Coalition has emerged as an advocacy and communications-driven entity through its increased interaction with various media organizations. The result of which is a marked increase in reporting on water, sanitation and hygiene issues in the media, which played an influential part in convincing the Government to endorse WASH programmes. WASH Coalitions are involved in activities ranging from participating in information sharing to advocating specific policy changes and everything in between, with approaches tailored to suit the country it operates in. Each coalition, though, has in common a commitment to addressing the need for improved systematic communication, collaboration, and joint action among sector stakeholders in their country of operation.