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Find out how Josephat Geteya Onchari was triggered to become a key WASH champion for Kenya.

She is determined that no one is left behind in menstrual hygiene management

The GSF works with schools and the broader education sector to achieve sustainable sanitation and hygiene for all

The GSF supports partners to address the global sanitation and hygiene crisis, so that everyone can enjoy healthy and productive lives.

On International Women’s Day, Chris Williams writes that there is more to adding women to the workplace; they need an enabling space

Executive Director Chris Williams reinforced WSSCC’s mandate that supports Sustainable Development Goal 6.2.

In the second of a seven-part series for WASH practitioners, we explore the nuances of slippage and its impact on communities.

In Cambodia, a Global Sanitation Fund (GSF)-supported programme is using real-time and action learning techniques to increase its impact.

The first Kenya Water Week was held in Nairobi from 20-25 November 2016, with the theme “From Aid to Trade”.

The theme of the annual advocacy event was to make handwashing a habit.

Through peer-to-peer learning, the Global Sanitation Fund is harnessing the immense amount of knowledge.

In June, July and August WSSCC reached out to its members and partners in 16 countries through dedicated national consultations.

Resources

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Sustainable Sanitation For All – Case studies by Elizabeth Wamera...

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Great strides have been made in improving sanitation in many developing countries. Yet, 2.4 billion people worldwide still lack access to adequate sanitation facilities and the poorest and most vulnerable members of society are often not reached and their specific needs are not met. Moreover, sustainability is currently one of the key challenges in CLTS and wider WASH practice, subsuming issues such as behaviour change, equity and inclusion, physical sustainability and sanitation marketing, monitoring and verification, engagement of governments, NGOs and donors, particularly after open defecation free (ODF) status is reached, and more. There have been several useful studies on sustainability that have highlighted some of these different aspects as well as the complexities involved. This book develops these key themes by exploring current experience, practices, challenges, innovations and insights, as well as identifying a future research agenda and gaps in current knowledge.WSSCC’s Elizabeth Wamera, Civil Society and National Engagement Officer’s chapter on post-ODF management process by the community is available for download from the book “Sustainable Sanitation for all: Experiences, challenges and innovations”. The chapter Who is managing the post-ODF process in the community? A case study of Nambale sub-county in Western Kenya, is based on the success of Nambale sub-county, which was declared ODF in 2012, and looks at the role of Community Health Workers (CHWs), discussing challenges that could be threatening ODF achievement and sustainability. As post-ODF follow-up is central to sustaining open defecation free (ODF) status, and needs to be integrated into CLTS programming from the outset, the chapter explores the responsibilities of carrying out these activities, and how they might be motivated and financed. The CLTS Knowledge Hub's newly launched book describes the landscape of the sustainability of Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) and sanitation with references to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and through examples from Africa and Asia. Featured in the book are a range of experiences and innovations from institutions and actors within the WASH sector attempting to make recommendations and practical suggestions for policy and practice for practitioners, funders, policymakers and governments.Sustainable Development Goal Target 6.2 aims, by 2030, to achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and end open defecation (OD), paying special attention to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations. If we are serious about leaving no one behind, we will need to put human beings first, and infrastructure designed to serve them second. Many individuals and groups cannot use sanitation and hygiene facilities due to physical or societal restrictions placed on them by their gender, disability, age, caste, religion, gender, or poverty. Non-discrimination should be embedded into policy and practice, so that people’s realities, needs, and demands are clearly articulated and matched with budgets, adapted public facilities on the ground, more equitable sharing of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) burdens, and systematic, meaningful participation in decision-making and monitoring. This chapter summarizes the testimonies and aspirations of individuals across a number of Asian countries who were never asked what they need and who are excluded from services. They remind us that in order to leave no one behind we will need to listen to them, involve them fully at all key stages, and forge true partnerships to achieve shared goals.
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National Coordinators Report – Highlights 2015

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Sixteen National Coordinators work within WASH coalitions in their home countries, leading WSSCC’s work, serving as coalition heads and spokespersons, and advocating on WASH issues. National Coordinators carry out national and local level networking, knowledge management, advocacy and communications activities, and working on facilitating and implementing Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) programme activities. Working with partners and networks, they aim to position sanitation and hygiene onto the national agenda and prioritize specific investments for sanitation and hygiene. This report shows how WSSCC's National Coordinators have increased the visibility of WSSCC in their respective countries and how their collective commitment has contributed to greater commitments from rights holders, duty bearers, the private sector and partners.Rapport des coordinateurs nationaux 2015 - Les coordinateurs nationaux du WSSCC sont actifs dans 16 pays d’Asie du Sud-Est, d’Afrique de l’Ouest, d’Asie du Sud et d’Afrique orientale et australe. En 2015, ils ont pu faciliter et entreprendre des activités variées, qui illustrent l’activisme local et mondial en faveur du secteur WASH, et le dynamisme de l’approche collaborative du WSSCC. Avec l’adoption des objectifs de développement durable (ODD) en septembre 2015, les coordinateurs nationaux continuent de contribuer à ce secteur en portant davantage attention aux questions d’expansion et d’équité, conformément aux nouveaux objectifs. Ils canalisent les efforts des coalitions WASH et des autorités publiques pour mettre fin à la pratique de la défécation à l’air libre, et veillent à ce que les améliorations sanitaires soient adaptées aux personnes vulnérables et aux groupes socialement marginalisés. Pour se concentrer sur l’expansion et l’équité, ils s’appuient sur les résultats et l’expérience des 13 programmes nationaux d’amélioration de l’assainissement et de l’hygiène soutenus par le GSF ainsi que sur les activités du WSSCC relatives à l’égalité et à la non-discrimination.
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East Africa Workshop on Scaling Up of CLTS and Enhancing Area Cov...

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This document reports on an international workshop on Scaling up of CLTS and Enhancing Area Coverage: Running the last miles towards MDG sanitation targeting the next 24 months. The workshop brought together participants from eight African countries, as well as one Caribbean country, to share experience to date and chalk out strategies for moving the sanitation agenda forward over the next two years. Nearly all participants were highly experienced CLTS practitioners involved in mostly large-scale CLTS sanitation programmes. The workshop was designed to create a learning environment in which best practice, challenges and responses from the different countries could be shared, discussed, and where appropriate absorbed into the action plans of all countries. The eight African countries – hosts Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Somalia, Madagascar, Sudan, South Sudan and Ghana – represented a range of stages and scales of CLTS work, as well as a range of funding mechanisms and implementation modalities.