Latest News

Findings of a new UN Women/WSSCC study in Niger on MHM practices were presented at a side event during CSW61.

Global Sanitation Fund programmes are designed to incorporate gender considerations and equity dimensions.

The podcast encourages discussion on menstrual and feminine hygiene issues and the right to sanitation for women and girls.

On International Women’s Day, Chris Williams writes that there is more to adding women to the workplace; they need an enabling space

The lack of adequate sanitation and waste systems presents a considerable challenge for sustainable waste management across Africa.

WSSCC Member Daniel Iroegbu’s inspirational work is impacting the lives of women and girls in hard-to-reach areas of the country.

Join us at CSW in New York for the findings of a new study on the sanitation and hygiene needs of women working in the informal sector in Niger.

The event included able and disabled women and girls, who traveled from many parts of Nepal to share their real-life experiences.

Do you know what the stress points are for women and girls in their daily sanitation routines? How do they cope? Join our March 2nd webinar.

WSSCC is working to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 6.2, to provide sanitation and hygiene for all, and does this in a number of ways.

The mission was to collect data to make proposals for a better integration of MHM into sanitation projects.

Sub-Saharan Africa alone hosts more than 29 per cent of the world’s displaced people, numbering more than 20 million people.

Resources

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Menstrual Hygiene Management – The experience of nomadic and sede...

Equality
This study examines and analyses behaviours and practices for the management of menstrual hygiene and their impact on the living conditions of sedentary and nomadic women and girls in Niger. The study was carried out in the regions of Maradi, Zinder, Tahoua and Tillabéri under the Joint Programme on Gender, Hygiene and Sanitation in West and Central Africa and implemented by WSSCC and UN Women. The findings of the study reveal various shortcomings, especially in rural areas and, more specifically, among nomadic populations. It highlights that women and girls can fully participate in society and the economy and lead active lives in school, work and leisure if they are better informed. The study also recommends that MHM needs to be clearly articulated in public policies and national strategies with associated budgets and monitoring systems.La présente étude sur la gestion de l’hygiène menstruelle (GHM) examine et analyse les comportements et les pratiques en matière de gestion de l’hygiène menstruelle et leur impact sur les conditions de vie des femmes et des filles sédentaires et nomades au Niger. L’étude été réalisée dans quatre régions du Niger: Maradi, Zinder, Tahoua, et Tillabéri. Elle s’inscrit dans le cadre du programme conjoint du Conseil de concertation pour l’approvisionnement en eau et l’assainissement WSSCC et d’ONU Femmes « Genre, Hygiène et Assainissement » mené en Afrique de l’ouest et du centre.
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WSSCC Women’s Week 2017 – Social media package

Equality
Did you know that women, on average, menstruate 3,000 days in their lifetime? Join us in celebrating International Women's Day on March 8 by sharing our MHM factoid and our member story in English and in French.
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A gender case study of the experience and outcomes of Fonds D’App...

Global Sanitation Fund
This study explores the role that gender plays in shaping the experience and outcomes of the Fonds D’Appui pour l’assainissement (FAA) Community-led Total Sanitation (CLTS) interventions in Madagascar. Through a qualitative study in four villages in the Itasy region, this study finds that there is a difference in the way women and men actively engage in the CLTS process. Despite this, it finds that gender does not prevent people from realizing the benefits of sanitation and indeed some empowerment outcomes including increased respect, new roles for women and improved voice in the community around sanitation. However, the ability to contribute to decision-making and change gender stereotypes around roles and responsibilities, such as for cleaning and maintaining the toilet, raises questions for women and men’s long-term sanitation facilities and behaviours.
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Best Practices of the Joint Programme on Gender, Hygiene and Sani...

Equality
The Joint Programme on Gender, Hygiene and Sanitation is designed and implemented by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) and the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) in West and Central Africa. The Programme supports governments in the formulation of evidence based and inclusive policies that address the fulfilment of women’s and girls’ human rights to water and sanitation. One of the approaches of the programme is the training of trainers’ workshop for government officers who will act as agents of change and play a catalytic role in transforming sanitation, health and education policies to include women’s and girls’ rights. Over the last few years, the interconnectivity of sanitation with other sectors has become more and more evident. To achieve sanitation and hygiene for all, everywhere, it is critical to collaborate with other sectors, to develop new tools, systems and mechanisms for the delivery of WASH services in schools, markets, work places, public spaces, etc. After two years of implementation, the Joint Programme has contributed to filling knowledge gaps on sanitation and hygiene for women and girls living in West and Central Africa.Bonnes pratiques du programme conjoint genre hygiène et assainissement: Le Programme Conjoint Genre, Hygiène et Assainissement a été conçu et est mis en oeuvre par le Conseil de concertation pour l’approvisionnement en eau et l’assainissement (WSSCC) et l’Entité des Nations Unies pour l’égalité des sexes et l’autonomisation des femmes (ONU Femmes) en Afrique de l’Ouest et du Centre. Ce Programme appuie les gouvernements pour la formulation de politiques inclusives basées sur les résultats de la recherche, en faveur de l’exercice des droits humains des femmes et des filles à l’eau et à l’assainissement. Une des approches de ce programme est la formation des formateurs destinée prioritairement aux fonctionnaires gouvernementaux qui serviront d’agents de changement et qui joueront un rôle catalytique dans la transformation des politiques en matière d’assainissement, de santé et d’éducation pour y inclure les droits des femmes et des filles. Ces dernières années, l’interconnexion de l’assainissement avec les autres secteurs est devenue de plus en plus évidente. Pour que l’hygiène et l’assainissement concernent tout un chacun, partout, il est indispensable de collaborer avec d’autres secteurs et d’élaborer de nouveaux outils, systèmes et mécanismes qui apporteront les services WASH dans les écoles, sur les marchés, sur les lieux de travail, dans les lieux publics, etc Au bout de deux années de mise en œuvre, le Programme conjoint a contribué à combler les lacunes dans la connaissance de l’hygiène et de l’assainissement pour les femmes et les filles vivant en Afrique de l’Ouest et du Centre.
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Information letter 8 – WSSCC/UN Women Joint Programme on Gender, ...

Equality
Highlighting the main points and events since the beginning of this year (1 January), this information letter focuses on: responding to the situation of refugee women and girls in Cameroon and providing some recommendations; the Joint Programme featured at the 60th meeting of the Commission on the Status of Women through a side event on Achieving Gender Equality through WASH; the special focus of the Joint Programme on nomadic communities, refugee population and female genital mutilation through upcoming studies in three pilot countries; the review of the Yammer platform activities one year after its launch; the results of the trainers’ follow up survey; the first MHM Lab held in Niger this summer.Revenant sur les principaux points et évènements qui se sont déroulés depuis le début de l’année (janvier 2016), cette édition de la lettre d’information aborde les thèmes suivants : des recommandations afin de mieux répondre aux besoins des femmes et des filles réfugiées notamment au Cameroun ; le Programme Conjoint au niveau global à travers, entre autres, son évènement parallèle lors de la 60ème session de la Commission sur la Condition de la Femme (CSW); l’attention particulière portée par le Programme Conjoint sur les populations nomades, réfugiées ou excisées avec 3 prochaines études dans les pays pilotes; le bilan de l’activité de la plateforme Yammer des formateurs en GHM après une année d’existence ainsi que les résultats de l’enquête en ligne de suivi auprès des formateurs en GHM ; et enfin le premier Labo en GHM qui s’est tenu au Niger cet été.
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Applied research in water, sanitation and hygiene – Summary repor...

Collaboration
In October 2016, the WSSCC LinkedIn Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene in Developing Countries and the Centre of Excellence in Water and Sanitation at Mzuzu University came together to hold a joint 3‐week thematic discussion on applied research in water, sanitation and hygiene. The LinkedIn hosted CoP has over 6,200 members each working in WASH and other related sectors; this thematic discussion was an opportunity to bring together sector practitioners and researchers to share knowledge, learn from each other, identify best practice and explore links between research and practice in the sector. The first discussion was held from 3 to 9 October 2016 and focused on ‘How to pull practitioners into research.The second thematic discussion hosted by WSSCC and the Centre of Excellence in Water and Sanitation at Mzuzu University was held from 10 to 16 October 2016 and focused on ‘Low‐cost WASH technologies’. The discussion was led by Assistant Professor Dr. Abebe Beyene Hailu at Jimma University, Ethiopia.
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Leave No One Behind – Country Reports

Equality
Leave No One Behind - Afghanistan Country Report: This report is one in a series of 8 country reports produced as a result of the Leave No One Behind consultative process. It captures the current WASH practices, challenges and aspirations of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka vulnerable groups from Qarabagh, Paghman, Bagrami and Kabul districts of Kabul Province, Afghanistan.Leave No One Behind - Bangladesh Country Report: As part of the Leave No One Behind consultative process in South Asia, ten meetings were organised by the Bangladesh chapter of FANSA with women, adolescent girls, elderly, persons with disabilities, transgender people and sanitation workers and waste collectors in different parts of the country in collaboration with CSOs working with these groups.Leave No One Behind - Bhutan Country Report: This report is the outcome of a consultation with a group of women, adolescent girls, sanitation workers, people with disabilities and senior citizens, organised in Bhutan in November 2015 with support from FANSA and WSSCC. The purpose of this interaction was to gain an understanding of their current sanitation and hygiene status, practices and challenges in their daily life.Leave No One Behind - India Country Report: In India, eighteen consultation meetings were held across six states with participants from different vulnerable groups. A total of 999 people participated in these meetings, including 260 women and adolescent girls, 182 elderly people and persons with disabilities, 236 sanitation workers and waste pickers and 36 members of the transgender community. Modern Architects for Rural India (MARI) led the consultative process with the support of 30 local organisations.Leave No One Behind - Maldives Country Report: This report summarizes the main challenges as well as key asks of people with disabilities, adolescent school children, construction workers, fishermen, elderly and sanitation workers in Maldives with regard to access to hygiene and sanitation services. These groups raised their concerns in the consultation held by WaterCare in the Maldives National University at the initiative of FANSA and WSSCC.Leave No One Behind - Nepal Country Report: The consultations with vulnerable groups from different parts of the country was an opportunity to openly interact with individuals on their sanitation and hygiene experiences that are critical aspects of their well-being and dignity. Women and adolescent girls, elderly people, persons with disabilities and the sanitation workers actively participated in the consultations where they shared their life story and struggles without adequate sanitation facilities at the household level, at the workplace and in public places.Leave No One Behind - Pakistan Country Report: In Pakistan, a total of eight consultation meetings were held between October 29 and November 20, 2015 to capture the current WASH practices, the associated and coping strategies among women and adolescent girls, the elderly and disabled and sanitary workers and waste pickers. In total, 551 participants from urban, peri-urban, slums and rural parts of Pakistan participated in the consultations. They included 187 women and adolescent girls, 145 elderly and persons with disabilities, and 219 sanitation workers and waste segregators. The meetings were organized by Punjab Urban Resource Centre with support from 11 local partner organizations in eight districts of the country.Leave No One Behind – Sri Lanka Country Report: In Sri Lanka, six consultations were conducted with a total of 218 participants, including 75 sanitation workers, 55 plantation workers, 63 women, and 25 differently-abled people. Seven organizations representing the fishing community, plantation workers, persons with disabilities and municipal councils supported CEJ in organizing these consultations. Participants were given an opportunity to share their experiences and observations on WASH issues using participatory methods. This report captures the major points shared by these groups.
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First National Training of Trainers on Menstrual Hygiene Manageme...

Equality
In order to break the silence on menstruation and empower government officials with the knowledge and skills on Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM), WSSCC, in collaboration with the Kenyan Ministry of Health, UNICEF and other partners held a six-day Training of Trainers(ToT) in Naivasha from 28 July to 3 August. Here is a full report of the workshop.