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Handwashing with soap is an amazing tool to defeat diarrheal diseases, reduce newborn and child mortality, and much more.

WSSCC National Coordinator in Benin Félix Adégnika is leading a campaign to include the human rights to water and sanitation in the national constitution

The theme of the annual advocacy event was to make handwashing a habit.

The event provided an opportunity for detailed exchange and learning on scaling up and sustaining improved sanitation and hygiene.

The GSF focuses on continuous learning to boost implementation, innovation and advocacy.

The most recent statistics for Zimbabwe show that only 40% of the country’s 13 million citizens have access to improved WASH.

Experts on evaluation and UN professionals discussed how advocacy can be evaluated at an event hosted by WSSCC & 3ie.

WSSCC and UN Women issue a quarterly information letter on the Joint Programme on “Gender, Hygiene and Sanitation”.

This blog was written by Virginia Kamowa, Senior Programme Officer for Global Advocacy at WSSCC. For feedback and questions, please send an e-mail to “We need to influence government processes by working with various line ministries to ensure integration of WASH in all areas of development.” Hon. Jaqueline Amongin Member of Parliament (MP) and […]

The Water Supply & Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) recently hosted two Advocacy, Communications and Learning workshops in Togo and Uganda, respectively, which convened the Council’s partners from eleven countries in Africa. The two workshops were designed to build capacity and facilitate learning between country teams and with WSSCC’s Geneva-based Secretariat, in order for all country […]

This set of advocacy materials was developed to support the WASH campaign in addressing the current water and sanitation crisis, especially in light of the International Year of Sanitation 2008.


National Coordinators Report – Highlights 2015

Sixteen National Coordinators work within WASH coalitions in their home countries, leading WSSCC’s work, serving as coalition heads and spokespersons, and advocating on WASH issues. National Coordinators carry out national and local level networking, knowledge management, advocacy and communications activities, and working on facilitating and implementing Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) programme activities. Working with partners and networks, they aim to position sanitation and hygiene onto the national agenda and prioritize specific investments for sanitation and hygiene. This report shows how WSSCC's National Coordinators have increased the visibility of WSSCC in their respective countries and how their collective commitment has contributed to greater commitments from rights holders, duty bearers, the private sector and partners.Rapport des coordinateurs nationaux 2015 - Les coordinateurs nationaux du WSSCC sont actifs dans 16 pays d’Asie du Sud-Est, d’Afrique de l’Ouest, d’Asie du Sud et d’Afrique orientale et australe. En 2015, ils ont pu faciliter et entreprendre des activités variées, qui illustrent l’activisme local et mondial en faveur du secteur WASH, et le dynamisme de l’approche collaborative du WSSCC. Avec l’adoption des objectifs de développement durable (ODD) en septembre 2015, les coordinateurs nationaux continuent de contribuer à ce secteur en portant davantage attention aux questions d’expansion et d’équité, conformément aux nouveaux objectifs. Ils canalisent les efforts des coalitions WASH et des autorités publiques pour mettre fin à la pratique de la défécation à l’air libre, et veillent à ce que les améliorations sanitaires soient adaptées aux personnes vulnérables et aux groupes socialement marginalisés. Pour se concentrer sur l’expansion et l’équité, ils s’appuient sur les résultats et l’expérience des 13 programmes nationaux d’amélioration de l’assainissement et de l’hygiène soutenus par le GSF ainsi que sur les activités du WSSCC relatives à l’égalité et à la non-discrimination.

Advocacy, communications and monitoring of WASH commitments – WSS...

The “Advocacy, Communications and Monitoring of WASH Commitments” workshop took place in Cotonou, Benin, from Tuesday 18 to Thursday 20 February 2014. The meeting was organized by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) in association with the Benin Ministry of Health; the Partenariat pour le Développement Municipal, PDM, (Partnership for Municipal Development); and the West African WASH Journalists Network. It brought together some 30 journalists from the aforesaid network, along with others from Asia and East Africa. Civil society organizations active in the education, environment and health sectors also took part in the event. Over three days, participants from 17 countries attended various presentations on the following topics: Communications aspects of the behaviour change approach; WASH commitments – from AfricaSan and SocaSan to the Sanitation and Water for All meetings; Progress and challenges encountered by countries in implementing the eThekwini commitments; Post-2015 WASH targets and indicators; Equity and inclusion in WASH.L’atelier « Plaidoyer, communication et suivi des engagements WASH » s’est tenu à Cotonou au Bénin du mardi 18 au jeudi 20 février 2014. Organisé par le Conseil de Concertation pour l’Approvisionnement en Eau et l’Assainissement (WSSCC), en collaboration avec le Ministère de la Santé (MS) du Bénin, le Partenariat pour le Développement Municipal (PDM) et le Réseau de Journalistes WASH pour l’Afrique de l’ouest (WASH JN), cette réunion a regroupé une trentaine de journalistes du même réseau et d’autres venant de l’Asie et de l’Afrique australe. Des organisations de la société civile intervenant dans le secteur de l’éducation, de l’environnement et de la santé ont également pris part à la rencontre. Pendant 3 jours, les participants provenant de 17 pays, ont suivi plusieurs exposés2 sur les thématiques suivantes : Les aspects communicationnels dans l’approche pour le changement de comportement ; Les engagements WASH – D’AfricaSan, Sacosan aux réunions de Sanitation and Water for All (SWA); Les avancées et les défis rencontrés par les pays quant à la mise en œuvre des engagements eThekwini ; Les cibles et indicateurs WASH post 2015 ; L’équité et l’inclusion dans le domaine WASH.

Good Dignity Practices for Gross Domestic Product – Campaign mate...

Worldwide, more than one in three people lack access to a safe, hygienic toilet. This simple fact costs people their health, countries their GDP and billions their dignity. But there is a solution; we call it: GDP for GDP – Good Dignity Practices for Gross Domestic Product. Gross Domestic Product or GDP is an international term, widely understood by those in government, NGOs, CSOs and the private sector. GDP is motivating at all levels. For governments, it is the way they are measured. For the private sector, it is the background against which they function. To increase GDP is a sign of progress and stature. Any actions taken to improve sanitation and hygiene – from building a toilet to teaching children to wash their hands with soap – are Good Dignity Practices. These bring economic benefits and improve dignity. If you would like to receive further information on the GDP for GDP campaign, please get in touch with us via guidelinesGDP for GDP brochure: Don't waste a good investmentGDP for GDP poster: Invest in wasteGDP for GDP poster: Will you help turn shit into gold?GDP for GDP at a glance: Help turn shit into goldGDP for GDP PowerPoint presentation - Key messages

WASH Case Studies Series – Nepal

The Nepal WASH Coalition was formed in 2003 to serve a country where less than half of the population uses adequate sanitation facilities. Ranking low on the human poverty index means that Nepal faces major hurdles in ensuring a basic standard of living, including sustainable access to adequate sanitation, for its population. To reach the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for water and sanitation by 2015 would require the construction of at least 14,000 latrines every month until 2015. In this case study, part of the series analyzing individual countries, we examine how the Nepal WASH Coalition has emerged as an advocacy and communications-driven entity through its increased interaction with various media organizations. The result of which is a marked increase in reporting on water, sanitation and hygiene issues in the media, which played an influential part in convincing the Government to endorse WASH programmes. WASH Coalitions are involved in activities ranging from participating in information sharing to advocating specific policy changes and everything in between, with approaches tailored to suit the country it operates in. Each coalition, though, has in common a commitment to addressing the need for improved systematic communication, collaboration, and joint action among sector stakeholders in their country of operation.

WSSCC Annual Report 2007

WSSCC General
2007 was an exciting year for the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) as we defined and developed a new long-term strategy and internal structure to make us even more purposeful, viable, secure and results-oriented. WSSCC’s elected Steering Committee refocused the organization’s efforts on sanitation and hygiene, establishing a third core department, the Global Sanitation Fund, to complement the Networking & Knowledge Management and Advocacy & Communications departments. WSSCC established National WASH Coalitions in four more countries – Benin, Mali, Niger and Togo – bringing our active presence to a total of 36 countries. Our staff also met with members of National WASH Coalitions in Benin, Burkina Faso, India, Nepal, Niger, South Africa, Tanzania and Togo. Combined with involvement in the launch of the International Year of Sanitation (IYS) 2008 in New York, the 5th World Water Forum, and the World Water Week in Stockholm and LatinoSan. Our continual presence at global and regional fora ensured a high profile platform for promoting the new sanitation-focused mandate. This is just a taste of our activities. To find what else WSSCC did in 2007, take a look inside this Annual Report.

Advocacy Sourcebook – A guide to advocacy for WSSCC co-ordinators...

Out of every ten people in the world today, four do not have adequate sanitation and two don’t have access to clean water. Though preventable, related diseases cause the death of a child every 15 seconds. Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) campaigns, with their use of practical thinking and political commitment, can make a huge impact on these figures. Placing people’s initiatives and capacity for self-reliance at the centre of achieving water and sanitation targets, they address the issues of sustainability, affordability and equity. To complement the WASH approach, WSSCC and WaterAid have produced this practical guide on water and sanitation related advocacy work. In its four sections you'll find explanations of the different advocacy tools, practical examples of advocacy work, information on key policy actors and processes, along with how to influence them at local, national and international levels.