Resources

This resource page provides you with quick access to some of our most popular publications, e-toolkits and knowledge resources to key issues. Please explore the below resources or contact us for help with sanitation, hygiene and water supply-related resources, research or ideas.

8 resources found


Resources

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Joining Forces for Progress - Hygiene Matters Report 2016

Collaboration
Through its Hygiene Matters initiative, SCA raises awareness of the connection between hygiene, health and wellbeing around the world. As part of this initiative, since 2008, SCA has conducted five surveys to gather insights about global hygiene perceptions, issues and behaviours to contribute to a knowledge-based public debate with the goal of strengthening the possibility of improved hygiene for people everywhere. This year’s Hygiene Matters Report, created in cooperation with WSSCC, aims to advance awareness among policy makers and key stakeholders by visualizing and quantifying the value of investments in hygiene, shedding light on forces that are hindering development and showcasing innovative solutions that are driving it forward.
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Nepal earthquake: Reviving sanitation - Global Sanitation Fund Lessons

Global Sanitation Fund
Following the devastating 2015 earthquake in Nepal, the Global Sanitation Fund (GSF)-supported programme and partners underwent a significant learning journey, which has helped revive sanitation in the country. This journey is illustrated in a learning report produced by UN-Habitat, the GSF Executing Agency in Nepal.
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Leave No One Behind - Country Reports

Equality
Leave No One Behind - Afghanistan Country Report: This report is one in a series of 8 country reports produced as a result of the Leave No One Behind consultative process. It captures the current WASH practices, challenges and aspirations of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka vulnerable groups from Qarabagh, Paghman, Bagrami and Kabul districts of Kabul Province, Afghanistan.Leave No One Behind - Bangladesh Country Report: As part of the Leave No One Behind consultative process in South Asia, ten meetings were organised by the Bangladesh chapter of FANSA with women, adolescent girls, elderly, persons with disabilities, transgender people and sanitation workers and waste collectors in different parts of the country in collaboration with CSOs working with these groups.Leave No One Behind - Bhutan Country Report: This report is the outcome of a consultation with a group of women, adolescent girls, sanitation workers, people with disabilities and senior citizens, organised in Bhutan in November 2015 with support from FANSA and WSSCC. The purpose of this interaction was to gain an understanding of their current sanitation and hygiene status, practices and challenges in their daily life.Leave No One Behind - India Country Report: In India, eighteen consultation meetings were held across six states with participants from different vulnerable groups. A total of 999 people participated in these meetings, including 260 women and adolescent girls, 182 elderly people and persons with disabilities, 236 sanitation workers and waste pickers and 36 members of the transgender community. Modern Architects for Rural India (MARI) led the consultative process with the support of 30 local organisations.Leave No One Behind - Maldives Country Report: This report summarizes the main challenges as well as key asks of people with disabilities, adolescent school children, construction workers, fishermen, elderly and sanitation workers in Maldives with regard to access to hygiene and sanitation services. These groups raised their concerns in the consultation held by WaterCare in the Maldives National University at the initiative of FANSA and WSSCC.Leave No One Behind - Nepal Country Report: The consultations with vulnerable groups from different parts of the country was an opportunity to openly interact with individuals on their sanitation and hygiene experiences that are critical aspects of their well-being and dignity. Women and adolescent girls, elderly people, persons with disabilities and the sanitation workers actively participated in the consultations where they shared their life story and struggles without adequate sanitation facilities at the household level, at the workplace and in public places.Leave No One Behind - Pakistan Country Report: In Pakistan, a total of eight consultation meetings were held between October 29 and November 20, 2015 to capture the current WASH practices, the associated and coping strategies among women and adolescent girls, the elderly and disabled and sanitary workers and waste pickers. In total, 551 participants from urban, peri-urban, slums and rural parts of Pakistan participated in the consultations. They included 187 women and adolescent girls, 145 elderly and persons with disabilities, and 219 sanitation workers and waste segregators. The meetings were organized by Punjab Urban Resource Centre with support from 11 local partner organizations in eight districts of the country.Leave No One Behind – Sri Lanka Country Report: In Sri Lanka, six consultations were conducted with a total of 218 participants, including 75 sanitation workers, 55 plantation workers, 63 women, and 25 differently-abled people. Seven organizations representing the fishing community, plantation workers, persons with disabilities and municipal councils supported CEJ in organizing these consultations. Participants were given an opportunity to share their experiences and observations on WASH issues using participatory methods. This report captures the major points shared by these groups.
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GSF partners in action: Boosting WASH for schools and communities in Malawi

Global Sanitation Fund
“In the past, pupils used to skip classes as well as get sick very often. Pupils who would come to school one day were usually not the same ones the next day. And again, some of the girl students approaching adolescence were mostly shy at school when menstruating since there was no proper structures to support them. As a result, many of them dropped out.” In the open defecation free (ODF) Traditional Authority of Mwadzama, a Plan International project under the GSF-supported programme in Malawi has boosted water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) in schools. The project ensured the installation of boreholes and improved latrines, established school wash clubs and competitions, and supported community sanitation and hygiene campaigns. Since the start of the project school enrollment has also increased, which may be linked to project’s outputs.
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First National Training of Trainers on Menstrual Hygiene Management - Kenya

Equality
In order to break the silence on menstruation and empower government officials with the knowledge and skills on Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM), WSSCC, in collaboration with the Kenyan Ministry of Health, UNICEF and other partners held a six-day Training of Trainers(ToT) in Naivasha from 28 July to 3 August. Here is a full report of the workshop.
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Integrating Equity and Inclusion in Collective Behaviour Change under Swachh Bharat Mission

Collaboration
This summary report summarizes the findings of the WSSCC and WaterAid India organized consultation in Delhi that brought together a small, select group of collective behaviour change trainers and professionals working on equity issues, such as different kinds of disability, participation and MHM, so that together they could explore different ways of integrating equity and inclusion into the existing CLTS module keeping in mind the needs of marginalized individuals and groups.WSSCC in partnership with WaterAid India organized a one-day consultation in Delhi that brought together a small, select group of collective behaviour change trainers and professionals working on equity issues, such as different kinds of disability, participation and MHM, so that together they could explore different ways of integrating equity and inclusion into the existing CLTS module keeping in mind the needs of marginalized individuals and groups. The consultation gave interesting insights on how trainers have tried to implement the SBM guidelines on equity and inclusion and the challenges they have faced. A list of practical steps was developed that can be taken at each stage of the CLTS process to ensure that marginalized individuals and their issues are included. These findings can be found in this narrative report.
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Regional Consultative Workshops for Forward Planning of Rapid Action Learning Units (RALUs)

Collaboration
This note summarizes the main outcomes of the five jointly convened regional consultative workshops across India by the Government of India and WSSCC on forward planning of Rapid Action Learning Units under Swachh Bharat Mission (Gramin). The scoping exercise was undertaken by the WSSCC India team based in New Delhi. This summary note presents key findings together with recommendations for meaningful measurement of progress.This report summarizes the detailed discussions, deliberations and outcomes of five consultative workshops held across India. The scoping exercise was led by Sanchita Ghosh of WSSCC India with support from Kamini Prakash and Vinod Mishra and guidance from Archana Patkar.This PowerPoint presentation summarizes the main outcomes of the five jointly convened regional consultative workshops across India by the Government of India and WSSCC on forward planning of Rapid Action Learning Units under Swachh Bharat Mission (Gramin).
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Sustainable Sanitation For All - Case studies by Elizabeth Wamera and Archana Patkar

Collaboration
Great strides have been made in improving sanitation in many developing countries. Yet, 2.4 billion people worldwide still lack access to adequate sanitation facilities and the poorest and most vulnerable members of society are often not reached and their specific needs are not met. Moreover, sustainability is currently one of the key challenges in CLTS and wider WASH practice, subsuming issues such as behaviour change, equity and inclusion, physical sustainability and sanitation marketing, monitoring and verification, engagement of governments, NGOs and donors, particularly after open defecation free (ODF) status is reached, and more. There have been several useful studies on sustainability that have highlighted some of these different aspects as well as the complexities involved. This book develops these key themes by exploring current experience, practices, challenges, innovations and insights, as well as identifying a future research agenda and gaps in current knowledge.WSSCC’s Elizabeth Wamera, Civil Society and National Engagement Officer’s chapter on post-ODF management process by the community is available for download from the book “Sustainable Sanitation for all: Experiences, challenges and innovations”. The chapter Who is managing the post-ODF process in the community? A case study of Nambale sub-county in Western Kenya, is based on the success of Nambale sub-county, which was declared ODF in 2012, and looks at the role of Community Health Workers (CHWs), discussing challenges that could be threatening ODF achievement and sustainability. As post-ODF follow-up is central to sustaining open defecation free (ODF) status, and needs to be integrated into CLTS programming from the outset, the chapter explores the responsibilities of carrying out these activities, and how they might be motivated and financed. The CLTS Knowledge Hub's newly launched book describes the landscape of the sustainability of Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) and sanitation with references to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and through examples from Africa and Asia. Featured in the book are a range of experiences and innovations from institutions and actors within the WASH sector attempting to make recommendations and practical suggestions for policy and practice for practitioners, funders, policymakers and governments.Sustainable Development Goal Target 6.2 aims, by 2030, to achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and end open defecation (OD), paying special attention to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations. If we are serious about leaving no one behind, we will need to put human beings first, and infrastructure designed to serve them second. Many individuals and groups cannot use sanitation and hygiene facilities due to physical or societal restrictions placed on them by their gender, disability, age, caste, religion, gender, or poverty. Non-discrimination should be embedded into policy and practice, so that people’s realities, needs, and demands are clearly articulated and matched with budgets, adapted public facilities on the ground, more equitable sharing of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) burdens, and systematic, meaningful participation in decision-making and monitoring. This chapter summarizes the testimonies and aspirations of individuals across a number of Asian countries who were never asked what they need and who are excluded from services. They remind us that in order to leave no one behind we will need to listen to them, involve them fully at all key stages, and forge true partnerships to achieve shared goals.
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