Sanitation for a Better Cambodia – The Cambodia Rural Sanitation and Hygiene Improvement Programme (CR-SHIP)

Regionally and globally, Cambodia has comparatively low levels of access to basic sanitation and hygiene in rural areas. Lack of access is widely recognized as a cause for the spread of disease and economic loss for countries. In Cambodia, diarrhoea is indeed a major factor for the country’s child death, which remains relatively high, despite significant decrease to 54 deaths per 1000 live births in 2013. In 2010, Cambodia was selected as a focus country for programmes to improve access to sanitation and hygiene by the Global Sanitation Fund (GSF). GSF partners work closely with government sanitation and hygiene programmes and other water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) stakeholders to implement transformative programmes focused on 4 three core principles: national leadership; targeting poor and unserved communities; and ensuring interventions are people-centered, community-managed, and demand-driven. The CR-SHIP partnership, led by Plan Cambodia as the Executing Agency, includes sub-grantees selected from government agencies, local authorities, local and international NGOs, and individuals or private firms with experience and competence in the sector. The programme promotes sanitation and hygiene behavior change through five effective approaches: CLTS, school and community water, sanitation and hygiene (SC-WASH) and sanitation marketing, behavior change communication (BCC), and information, education and communication materials.

General Information
Authors: Plan Cambodia Publication Date: December 2014 Publisher: WSSCC/Plan Cambodia No. of Pages: 12

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