Health and Hygiene across the Life Course: World Health Assembly 2017 side session report

During the World Health Assembly 2017, the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC), SCA, Government of Kenya and WaterAid came together to share approaches to ensure good hygiene and health practices and to raise standards across the life course, from childhood to adolescence, from motherhood to menopause, to old age and responding to disabilities. The session took place in the morning on 24 May 2017 at the Intercontinental Hotel in Geneva, and was attended by more than 40 international delegates from UN agencies, private sector, member states, NGOs and academia.

General Information
Authors: WSSCC Publication Date: June 2017 Publisher: WSSCC No. of Pages: 7

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