Applied research in water, sanitation and hygiene – Summary reports from the thematic discussion in the LinkedIn Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene – 3-22 October 2016

In October 2016, the WSSCC LinkedIn Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene in Developing Countries and the Centre of Excellence in Water and Sanitation at Mzuzu University came together to hold a joint 3‐week thematic discussion on applied research in water, sanitation and hygiene. The LinkedIn hosted CoP has over 6,200 members each working in WASH and other related sectors; this thematic discussion was an opportunity to bring together sector practitioners and researchers to share knowledge, learn from each other, identify best practice and explore links between research and practice in the sector. The first discussion was held from 3 to 9 October 2016 and focused on ‘How to pull practitioners into research.

General Information
Authors: Mzuzu University/WSSCC Publication Date: 10 October 2016 Publisher: Mzuzu University/WSSCC No. of Pages: 7

The second thematic discussion hosted by WSSCC and the Centre of Excellence in Water and Sanitation at Mzuzu University was held from 10 to 16 October 2016 and focused on ‘Low‐cost WASH technologies’. The discussion was led by Assistant Professor Dr. Abebe Beyene Hailu at Jimma University, Ethiopia.

Authors: Mzuzu University/WSSCC Publication Date: 18 October 2016 Publisher: Mzuzu University/WSSCC No. of Pages: 8

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