Advocacy, communications and monitoring of WASH commitments – WSSCC Benin Workshop Report

The “Advocacy, Communications and Monitoring of WASH Commitments” workshop took place in Cotonou, Benin, from Tuesday 18 to Thursday 20 February 2014. The meeting was organized by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) in association with the Benin Ministry of Health; the Partenariat pour le Développement Municipal, PDM, (Partnership for Municipal Development); and the West African WASH Journalists Network. It brought together some 30 journalists from the aforesaid network, along with others from Asia and East Africa. Civil society organizations active in the education, environment and health sectors also took part in the event. Over three days, participants from 17 countries attended various presentations on the following topics: Communications aspects of the behaviour change approach; WASH commitments – from AfricaSan and SocaSan to the Sanitation and Water for All meetings; Progress and challenges encountered by countries in implementing the eThekwini commitments; Post-2015 WASH targets and indicators; Equity and inclusion in WASH.

General Information
Authors: WSSCC Publication Date: March 2014 Publisher: WSSCC No. of Pages: 48

L’atelier « Plaidoyer, communication et suivi des engagements WASH » s’est tenu à Cotonou au Bénin du mardi 18 au jeudi 20 février 2014. Organisé par le Conseil de Concertation pour l’Approvisionnement en Eau et l’Assainissement (WSSCC), en collaboration avec le Ministère de la Santé (MS) du Bénin, le Partenariat pour le Développement Municipal (PDM) et le Réseau de Journalistes WASH pour l’Afrique de l’ouest (WASH JN), cette réunion a regroupé une trentaine de journalistes du même réseau et d’autres venant de l’Asie et de l’Afrique australe. Des organisations de la société civile intervenant dans le secteur de l’éducation, de l’environnement et de la santé ont également pris part à la rencontre. Pendant 3 jours, les participants provenant de 17 pays, ont suivi plusieurs exposés2 sur les thématiques suivantes : Les aspects communicationnels dans l’approche pour le changement de comportement ; Les engagements WASH – D’AfricaSan, Sacosan aux réunions de Sanitation and Water for All (SWA); Les avancées et les défis rencontrés par les pays quant à la mise en œuvre des engagements eThekwini ; Les cibles et indicateurs WASH post 2015 ; L’équité et l’inclusion dans le domaine WASH.

Authors: WSSCC Publication Date: March 2014 Publisher: WSSCC No. of Pages: 48

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