Global Sanitation Fund

The Global Sanitation Fund is a pooled global fund established by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) and funded by its donors to gather and direct finance to help large numbers of people achieve improved sanitation and adopt good hygiene practices.

GSF COUNTRIES
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Key Results

Key Results

31 December 2015
toilet
People with improved toilets
6.62 Million
door
People living in open defecation free environments
10.87 Million
hand
People with handwashing facilities
15.69 Million

Latest News

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Participants shared best practices, common challenges, and promising innovations to end open defecation by 2025.

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The 2016 GSF Learning Event produced lessons on scale, sustainability, equality and monitoring for sanitation and hygiene programmes.

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Many WASH programmes are confronted with ‘slippage’. How should this issue be understood and addressed?

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Three Traditional Authorities supported by GSF-funded programme in Malawi recently celebrated becoming open defecation free.

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Through peer-to-peer learning, the Global Sanitation Fund is harnessing the immense amount of knowledge.

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After the earthquake in Nepal, the GSF-supported programme & partners underwent a learning journey, which is illustrated in a new report.

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DAPP is a non-profit organization working on sanitation activities related to the GSF-supported programme in Malawi.

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On the ground and in communities, Sub-grantees are the lifeblood of Global Sanitation Fund (GSF)-supported country programmes.

Resources

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Gender and Community-Led Total Sanitation – CLTS engagement, outcomes ...

Global Sanitation Fund
In order to better understand the link between gender dynamics and the impact of its Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) interventions, the GSF supported a study in a small number of communities in Madagascar in 2015. These communities are in the area covered by the GSF-supported programme in Madagascar, known locally as ‘Fonds d’Appui pour l’Assainissement’ (FAA). This ‘GSF in focus’ case study highlights and reflects on the study.
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A gender case study of the experience and outcomes of Fonds D’Appui po...

Global Sanitation Fund
This study explores the role that gender plays in shaping the experience and outcomes of the Fonds D’Appui pour l’assainissement (FAA) Community-led Total Sanitation (CLTS) interventions in Madagascar. Through a qualitative study in four villages in the Itasy region, this study finds that there is a difference in the way women and men actively engage in the CLTS process. Despite this, it finds that gender does not prevent people from realizing the benefits of sanitation and indeed some empowerment outcomes including increased respect, new roles for women and improved voice in the community around sanitation. However, the ability to contribute to decision-making and change gender stereotypes around roles and responsibilities, such as for cleaning and maintaining the toilet, raises questions for women and men’s long-term sanitation facilities and behaviours.
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Sanitation and Hygiene Behaviour Change at Scale: Understanding Slippage

Global Sanitation Fund
As sanitation and hygiene programmes mature, the challenge shifts from bringing communities to ODF status to sustaining this status. In this context, many programmes are confronted with the issue of slippage. This concept refers to a return to previous unhygienic behaviours, or the inability of some or all community members to continue to meet all ODF criteria. This paper explores how to discern slippage nuances and patterns, strategies to address, pre-empt and mitigate it as well as alternative monitoring systems that capture the complexity of slippage more fully. The analysis and reflections are based on direct field experience, primarily from the GSF-supported programme in Madagascar. Moreover, the underpinning principle of the paper is that slippage is an expected aspect of behaviour change-oriented sanitation and hygiene interventions, especially those at scale, and not a sign of failure thereof.Modifier les comportements d’hygiène et d’assainissement à grande échelle – Comprendre la régression : Ce document de réflexion examine comment distinguer les nuances et les types de régression ; il étudie les stratégies qui visent à y répondre, à les prévenir et à les réduire ainsi que d’autres systèmes de suivi permettant de mieux appréhender la complexité de la régression. Les analyses et les réflexions reposent sur une expérience directe du terrain, provenant essentiellement du programme soutenu par le GSF à Madagascar. De plus, ce document est sous-tendu par un principe fondamental, à savoir que la régression est un aspect attendu des interventions en hygiène et assainissement qui sont axées sur la modification des comportements, surtout celles qui sont conduites à grande échelle, et qu’il ne s’agit pas d’un signe de l’échec de ces dernières.
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Catalytic programming for scale and sustainability: Conversations, ref...

Global Sanitation Fund
This publication explores the conversations, reflections and lessons that emanated from the sessions, workshops and presentations at the 2016 GSF Learning Event in Madagascar. The following themes, which were central to the Learning Event, are explored: Incorporating effective approaches for scale and decentralized programme delivery; Incorporating effective approaches to ensure sustainable behaviour change, as well as the sustainability of built capacity within institutions and other stakeholder groups; Ensuring a truly inclusive approach that leaves no one behind; and Addressing monitoring and evaluation challenges.Le GSF vise à contribuer à l’accès universel à des services d’hygiène et d’assainissement adéquats, comme les imaginent les stratégies ou les feuilles de route nationales, et les objectifs de développement durable. Le Fonds tente d’y arriver en suscitant la création, la démonstration et la reproduction de modèles nationaux, axés sur les résultats, provoquant des changements de comportements sanitaires et hygiéniques durables et à grande échelle. Pour ce faire, il est prévu que les programmes passent par trois étapes distinctes, mais qui se chevauchent souvent largement : la conception, leur démonstration et la transition. La Réunion pédagogique a donné l’occasion aux programmes de pays de réfléchir à ces trois phases dans le contexte de leur pays. La présente publication est structurée de telle sorte qu’elle reflète ces thèmes et explore les discussions, réflexions et enseignements qui s’y rapportent.