Video: CLTS ‘triggering’ in action

Date: 8th October 2015

Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 8 [name] => Global Sanitation Fund [slug] => globalsanitationfund [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 8 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 0 [count] => 115 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 3 [cat_ID] => 8 [category_count] => 115 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Global Sanitation Fund [category_nicename] => globalsanitationfund [category_parent] => 0 ) )

CLTS focuses on igniting change in sanitation and hygiene behavior within whole communities, rather than constructing toilets through subsidies. During this social awakening, or ‘triggering’ process in Madagascar, the community looks for visible faeces in their environment. When people realize they are eating faeces this provokes disgust, shame and impacts on dignity. The community then makes and immediate decision to end open defecation. These steps are highlighted in the video below, which features community activities under the GSF-funded programme in Madagascar.


Credit: Channel Africa

Triggering phases
GSF_Madagascar_Case_Study_Triggering_Phases_p4
Learn more about CLTS in Madagascar

Download the complete case study “Learning, progress and innovation: Sanitation and hygiene promotion in Madagascar”

Listen to a podcast on the work of the GSF-funded Madagascar programme

Related News

When WASH practitioners understand the patterns and causes of slippage, they can devise innovative strategies to avoid it.

Global Sanitation Fund programmes are designed to incorporate gender considerations and equity dimensions.

Monitoring slippage should go beyond the numbers to truly understand behaviour change and community dynamics.

Lessons from the GSF-supported Uganda programme for implementing CLTS at scale through a decentralized government system.