Menstrual Hygiene Management – WSSCC/UN Women Studies on Behaviour and Practices in Senegal and Cameroon

Date: 9th March 2015

Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 9 [name] => Equality [slug] => equality [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 9 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 0 [count] => 128 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 2 [cat_ID] => 9 [category_count] => 128 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Equality [category_nicename] => equality [category_parent] => 0 ) )

The WSSCC/UN Women Joint Programme on Gender, Hygiene and Sanitation

The Joint Programme on Gender, Hygiene and Sanitation combines the expertise and technical skills of two institutions with different but complementary mandates with the common goal of having women’s voices heard in order to enable women and girls to achieve their human rights. Implemented in Senegal and Cameroon, it aims to establish a framework within which all women and girls in this region will be able to benefit in a sustained manner from sanitation, hygiene and water (WASH) services.

Behaviour and Practices in the Louga Region, Senegal
cover_-_louga_study

At present, there are no public policies in West or Central Africa mentioning menstrual hygiene management. Under the UN Women/Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) joint programme, ˮGender, Hygiene and Sanitationˮ a survey, combined with focus groups discussion and interviews, were conducted in the Louga region of Senegal, in June 2014. The outcomes of this study provided critical information about menstrual hygiene management knowledge and practices in the region.

Downloads – English
Downloads – French

Behaviour and Practices in the Kedougou Region, Senegal

cover_-_kedougou_study

The study of menstrual hygiene management in the Kedougou region (Senegal) is the second in a series of research studies undertaken by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) and UN Women as part of the Joint Programme on Gender, Hygiene and Sanitation in West and Central Africa. Available information on menstrual hygiene management, (MHM) is extremely limited and behaviour and practices are largely undocumented. The study’s main objective is to establish a database of information on public policies, behaviour and practices with regard to menstrual hygiene management and to analyse their impact on the living conditions of women and girls in this largely rural and impoverished region of Senegal.

Downloads – English

Downloads – French


Behaviour and Practices in the Kye-Ossi and Bamoungoum Regions, Cameroon

This study is the third in a series by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) and UN Women within the Joint Programme on Gender, Hygiene and Sanitation in West and Central Africa. The study focused on two localities with different socio-cultural profiles: Kye-Ossi in the south and Bamoungoum in the west. It reports on the current state of MHM-related practices and behaviours and analyses infrastructure and public policies. Additionally the study investigates the availability and relevance of information on MHM and evaluates the impact of the situation on people’s living conditions, their health, educational levels and the employment of women and girls.

Downloads – English

Downloads – French

Related News

Managing menstruation in a safe and hygienic way can deeply impact the lives and prospects of women and girls

She is determined that no one is left behind in menstrual hygiene management

Presenting the Council’s documents and reports on Gender and WASH

We list some of our studies that evidence the links between poor sanitation and psycho-social stress